Get access

Acupuncture for neuropathic pain in adults

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Zi Yong Ju,

    1. Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Acumox and Tuina, Shanghai, China
  • Ke Wang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Research Lab of Surgery of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, Shanghai, China
    • Ke Wang, Research Lab of Surgery of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China. wangke8430@163.com.

  • Hua Shun Cui,

    1. Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Shanghai, China
  • Yibo Yao,

    1. Longhua Hospital, Shanghai Traditional Chinese Medicine University, Department of Anorectal Surgery, Shanghai, Shanghai, China
  • Shi Min Liu,

    1. Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Acupuncture and Tuina, Shanghai, China
  • Jia Zhou,

    1. Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Shanghai, China
  • Tong Yu Chen,

    1. Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Shanghai, China
  • Jun Xia

    1. The Ingenuity Centre, The University of Nottingham, Systematic Review Solutions Ltd, Nottingham, UK

Abstract

Background

Neuropathic pain may be caused by nerve damage, and is often followed by changes to the central nervous system. Uncertainty remains regarding the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture treatments for neuropathic pain, despite a number of clinical trials being undertaken.

Objectives

To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of acupuncture treatments for chronic neuropathic pain in adults.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, four Chinese databases, ClinicalTrials.gov and World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 14 February 2017. We also cross checked the reference lists of included studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with treatment duration of eight weeks or longer comparing acupuncture (either given alone or in combination with other therapies) with sham acupuncture, other active therapies, or treatment as usual, for neuropathic pain in adults. We searched for studies of acupuncture based on needle insertion and stimulation of somatic tissues for therapeutic purposes, and we excluded other methods of stimulating acupuncture points without needle insertion. We searched for studies of manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture or other acupuncture techniques used in clinical practice (such as warm needling, fire needling, etc).

Data collection and analysis

We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and pain relief. The secondary outcomes were any pain-related outcome indicating some improvement, withdrawals, participants experiencing any adverse event, serious adverse events and quality of life. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and for continuous outcomes we calculated the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. We also calculated number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) where possible. We combined all data using a random-effects model and assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE to generate 'Summary of findings' tables.

Main results

We included six studies involving 462 participants with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain (442 completers (251 male), mean ages 52 to 63 years). The included studies recruited 403 participants from China and 59 from the UK. Most studies included a small sample size (fewer than 50 participants per treatment arm) and all studies were at high risk of bias for blinding of participants and personnel. Most studies had unclear risk of bias for sequence generation (four out of six studies), allocation concealment (five out of six) and selective reporting (all included studies). All studies investigated manual acupuncture, and we did not identify any study comparing acupuncture with treatment as usual, nor any study investigating other acupuncture techniques (such as electroacupuncture, warm needling, fire needling).

One study compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture. We are uncertain if there is any difference between the two interventions on reducing pain intensity (n = 45; MD -0.4, 95% CI -1.83 to 1.03, very low-quality evidence), and neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain' (visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-10) average score was 5.8 and 6.2 respectively in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, where 0 = no pain). There was limited data on quality of life, which showed no clear difference between groups. Evidence was not available on pain relief, adverse events or other pre-defined secondary outcomes for this comparison.

Three studies compared acupuncture alone versus other therapies (mecobalamin combined with nimodipine, and inositol). Acupuncture may reduce the risk of 'no clinical response' to pain than other therapies (n = 209; RR 0.25, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.51), however, evidence was not available for pain intensity, pain relief, adverse events or any of the other secondary outcomes.

Two studies compared acupuncture combined with other active therapies (mecobalamin, and Xiaoke bitong capsule) versus other active therapies used alone. We found that the acupuncture combination group had a lower VAS score for pain intensity (n = 104; MD -1.02, 95% CI -1.09 to -0.95) and improved quality of life (n = 104; MD -2.19, 95% CI -2.39 to -1.99), than those receiving other therapy alone. However, the average VAS score of the acupuncture and control groups was 3.23 and 4.25 respectively, indicating neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain'. Furthermore, this evidence was from a single study with high risk of bias and a very small sample size. There was no evidence on pain relief and we identified no clear differences between groups on other parameters, including 'no clinical response' to pain and withdrawals. There was no evidence on adverse events.

The overall quality of evidence is very low due to study limitations (high risk of performance, detection, and attrition bias, and high risk of bias confounded by small study size) or imprecision. We have limited confidence in the effect estimate and the true effect is likely to be substantially different from the estimated effect.

Authors' conclusions

Due to the limited data available, there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of acupuncture for neuropathic pain in general, or for any specific neuropathic pain condition when compared with sham acupuncture or other active therapies. Five studies are still ongoing and seven studies are awaiting classification due to the unclear treatment duration, and the results of these studies may influence the current findings.

Resumen

Acupuntura para el dolor neuropático en adultos

Antecedentes

El dolor neuropático puede ser causado por daño nervioso y a menudo viene seguido de cambios en el sistema nervioso central. Todavía existe incertidumbre con respecto a la efectividad y la seguridad de los tratamientos con acupuntura para el dolor neuropático, a pesar de la realización de varios ensayos clínicos.

Objetivos

Evaluar la eficacia analgésica y los eventos adversos de la acupuntura para el dolor neuropático crónico en pacientes adultos.

Métodos de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, en cuatro bases de datos chinas, ClinicalTrials.gov y en la World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) el 14 febrero 2017. También se verificaron de forma cruzada las listas de referencias de los estudios incluidos.

Criterios de selección

Ensayos controlados aleatorios (ECA) con una duración del tratamiento de ocho semanas o más que compararon acupuntura (administrada sola o en combinación con otras terapias) con acupuntura simulada, otros tratamientos activos o tratamiento habitual, para el dolor neuropático en pacientes adultos. Se buscaron los estudios de acupuntura basada en la inserción de agujas y la estimulación de los tejidos somáticos con fines terapéuticos, y se excluyeron otros métodos de estimulación de los puntos de acupuntura sin inserción de agujas. Se buscaron los estudios de acupuntura manual, electroacupuntura u otras técnicas de acupuntura utilizadas en la práctica clínica (como agujas calientes, agujas encendidas, etc.).

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Se utilizaron los procedimientos metodológicos estándar previstos por la Colaboración Cochrane. Los resultados primarios fueron intensidad del dolor y alivio del dolor. Los resultados secundarios fueron cualquier resultado relacionado con el dolor que indicara alguna mejoría, retiros, participantes que presentaron cualquier evento adverso, eventos adversos graves y calidad de vida. Para los resultados dicotómicos se calculó el cociente de riesgos (CR) con intervalos de confianza (IC) del 95% y para los resultados continuos se calculó la diferencia de medias (DM) con los IC del 95%. Cuando fue apropiado, se calculó el número necesario a tratar para un resultado beneficioso adicional (NNTB). Todos los datos se combinaron mediante un modelo de efectos aleatorios y la calidad de la evidencia se evaluó mediante GRADE para generar las tablas "Resumen de los hallazgos".

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron seis estudios que incluyeron 462 participantes con dolor neuropático periférico crónico (442 participantes finalizaron el estudio [251 hombres], media de la edad 52 a 63 años). Los estudios incluidos reclutaron a 403 participantes de China y 59 del Reino Unido. En su mayoría los estudios tuvieron un tamaño de la muestra pequeño (menos de 50 participantes por brazo de tratamiento) y todos los estudios tuvieron alto riesgo de sesgo en el cegamiento de los participantes y el personal. En su mayoría los estudios tuvieron riesgo incierto de sesgo de generación de la secuencia (cuatro de seis estudios), ocultación de la asignación (cinco de seis) e informe selectivo (todos los estudios incluidos). Todos los estudios investigaron la acupuntura manual y no se identificaron estudios que compararan la acupuntura con tratamiento habitual, ni estudios que investigaran otras técnicas de acupuntura (como electroacupuntura, agujas calientes, agujas encendidas).

Un estudio comparó acupuntura con acupuntura simulada. No se sabe si hay diferencias entre las dos intervenciones en la reducción de la intensidad del dolor (n = 45; DM -0,4; IC del 95%: -1,83 a 1,03; evidencia de muy baja calidad) y ningún grupo logró "ningún dolor peor que dolor leve" (puntuación promedio en la escala analógica visual [EAV, 0 a 10] fue 5,8 y 6,2 respectivamente en los grupos de acupuntura y acupuntura simulada, donde 0 = ningún dolor). Hubo datos limitados sobre la calidad de vida que no mostraron diferencias claras entre los grupos. No hubo evidencia disponible sobre el alivio del dolor, los eventos adversos ni otros resultados secundarios predeterminados para esta comparación.

Tres estudios compararon acupuntura sola versus otros tratamientos (mecobalamina combinada con nimodipino, e inositol). La acupuntura puede reducir el riesgo de "ninguna respuesta clínica" al dolor en comparación con otros tratamientos (n = 209; CR 0,25; IC del 95%: 0,12 a 0,51); sin embargo, no hubo evidencia disponible para la intensidad del dolor, el alivio del dolor, los eventos adversos ni cualquiera de los otros resultados secundarios.

Dos estudios compararon la acupuntura combinada con otros tratamientos activos (mecobalamina y cápsula Xiaoke bitong) versus otros tratamientos activos utilizados solos. Se encontró que el grupo de acupuntura combinada tuvo una puntuación inferior en la EAV en la intensidad del dolor (n = 104; DM -1,02; IC del 95%: -1,09 a -0,95) y mejor calidad de vida (n = 104; DM -2,19; IC del 95%: -2,39 a -1,99), que los que recibieron otro tratamiento solo. Sin embargo, la puntuación promedio en la EAV de los grupos de acupuntura y control fue 3,23 y 4,25 respectivamente, lo que indica que ningún grupo logró "ningún dolor peor que dolor leve". Además, esta evidencia provino de un estudio único con alto riesgo de sesgo y un tamaño de la muestra muy pequeño. No hubo evidencia sobre el alivio del dolor y no se identificaron diferencias claras entre los grupos en otros parámetros, incluidos "ninguna respuesta clínica" al dolor y retiros. No hubo evidencia de eventos adversos.

La calidad general de la evidencia es muy baja debido a las limitaciones de los estudios (alto riesgo de sesgo de realización, detección y desgaste, y alto riesgo de sesgo por el tamaño pequeño de los estudios como factor de confusión) o la imprecisión. Por lo tanto, hubo muy poca confianza en la estimación del efecto, y es probable que el efecto verdadero sea significativamente diferente del efecto calculado.

Conclusiones de los autores

Debido a los limitados datos disponibles, no hay evidencia suficiente para apoyar ni refutar el uso de la acupuntura para el dolor neuropático en general, ni para cualquier afección específica de dolor neuropático en comparación con acupuntura simulada u otros tratamientos activos. Cinco estudios todavía están en curso y siete estudios aguardan a ser clasificados debido a la duración poco clara del tratamiento, y los resultados de estos estudios pueden influir en los resultados actuales.

Plain language summary

Acupuncture for neuropathic pain in adults

Review question

Is acupuncture safe and effective in the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain in adults?

Background

Neuropathic pain is a complex, chronic pain caused by damaged nerves. It is different from pain messages that are carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (for example, a fall or cut, or arthritic knee). Approximately 7% to 10% of the general population have neuropathic pain. Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) technique of treating disease by inserting needles into the skin, or the tissues below.

In this review, we were interested in whether acupuncture could relieve pain, improve quality of life, and cause fewer side effects than other treatment options, for adults with neuropathic pain. We looked for studies comparing acupuncture with sham acupuncture (sham acupuncture involves using a blunt needle that slides into the handle rather than penetrating the skin or tissues below). We also looked for studies comparing acupuncture with treatment as usual, or with other active therapies (such as mecobalamin, nimodipine, inositol, and Xiaoke bitong capsule).

Study characteristics

We conducted a search for relevant clinical trials in February 2017. We included six studies of manual acupuncture: one compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture; three investigated acupuncture combined with other active treatments compared with other active treatments alone; two compared acupuncture alone compared with other active treatments. The six studies involved 462 adults with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain. The participants were 52 to 63 years of age, on average. They received treatment for eight weeks or more. We did not find any study comparing acupuncture with treatment as usual, nor any study of other acupuncture techniques (such as electroacupuncture, warm needling, fire needling).

Key results and quality of evidence

We are uncertain about the beneficial effects of manual acupuncture on pain intensity, pain relief and quality of life when compared to sham acupuncture or other therapies (such as mecobalamin, nimodipine, inositol, and Xiaoke bitong capsule). There is a lack of evidence on the potential harms (side effects) of acupuncture.

We rated the quality of the evidence from studies using four levels: very low, low, moderate, or high. Very low-quality evidence means that we are very uncertain about the results. High-quality evidence means that we are very confident in the results. The quality of the evidence in this review is very low, mostly due to problems in the way the studies were conducted (such as the participants were not blinded to their treatment, or more participants in the sham acupuncture group left the study early). The studies also included a small number of participants. Moreover, these findings only apply to peripheral neuropathic pain in older adults.

Overall, we do not have sufficient evidence to support or refute the use of acupuncture in treating neuropathic pain.

Resumen en términos sencillos

Acupuntura para el dolor neuropático en adultos

Pregunta de la revisión

¿La acupuntura es segura y efectiva en el tratamiento del dolor neuropático crónico en pacientes adultos?

Antecedentes

El dolor neuropático es un dolor crónico complejo, causado por la lesión de los nervios. Es diferente de los mensajes de dolor transmitidos a lo largo de los nervios sanos a partir del tejido dañado (por ejemplo, una caída o corte o por artritis de la rodilla). Aproximadamente del 7% al 10% de la población general tiene dolor neuropático. La acupuntura es una técnica de la medicina tradicional china (MTC) para tratar las enfermedades al insertar agujas en la piel, o los tejidos subyacentes.

En esta revisión se tenía el interés de determinar si la acupuntura podría aliviar el dolor, mejorar la calidad de vida y causar menos efectos secundarios que otras opciones de tratamiento en pacientes adultos con dolor neuropático. Se buscaron los estudios que compararan acupuntura con acupuntura simulada (la acupuntura simulada incluye el uso de una aguja roma que se desliza en el mango en lugar de penetrar la piel o los tejidos subyacentes). También se buscaron los estudios que compararan acupuntura con tratamiento habitual, o con otros tratamientos activos (como mecobalamina, nimodipino, inositol y la cápsula Xiaoke bitong).

Características de los estudios

Se realizó una búsqueda de ensayos clínicos relevantes en febrero de 2017. Se incluyeron seis estudios de acupuntura manual: uno comparó acupuntura con acupuntura simulada; tres investigaron acupuntura combinada con otros tratamientos activos en comparación con otros tratamientos activos solos; dos compararon acupuntura sola con otros tratamientos activos. Los seis estudios incluyeron a 462 pacientes adultos con dolor neuropático periférico crónico. Los participantes tenían una edad de 52 a 63 años como promedio. Recibieron tratamiento durante ocho semanas o más. No se encontraron estudios que compararan acupuntura con tratamiento habitual, ni estudios de otras técnicas de acupuntura (como electroacupuntura, agujas calientes, agujas encendidas).

Resultados clave y calidad de la evidencia

No hay seguridad acerca de los efectos beneficiosos de la acupuntura manual sobre la intensidad del dolor, el alivio del dolor ni la calidad de vida en comparación con la acupuntura simulada u otros tratamientos (como mecobalamina, nimodipino, inositol y la cápsula Xiaoke bitong). Hay falta de evidencia con respecto a los efectos perjudiciales (efectos secundarios) potenciales de la acupuntura.

Se clasificó la calidad de la evidencia de los estudios en cuatro niveles: muy baja, baja, moderada o alta. La evidencia de muy baja calidad indica que no se sabe la fibilidad de los resultados. La evidencia de alta calidad significa que existe mucha seguridad en cuanto a los resultados. La calidad de la evidencia en esta revisión es muy baja debido principalmente a los problemas en la manera en la que se realizaron los estudios (como que los participantes no se cegaron al tratamiento, o que más participantes del grupo de acupuntura simulada abandonó el estudio antes de completarse). Los estudios también incluyeron un pequeño número de participantes. Además, estos resultados solamente se aplican al dolor neuropático periférico en pacientes adultos mayores.

En general, no hay evidencia suficiente para apoyar ni refutar el uso de la acupuntura para tratar el dolor neuropático.

Notas de traducción

La traducción y edición de las revisiones Cochrane han sido realizadas bajo la responsabilidad del Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano, gracias a la suscripción efectuada por el Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad del Gobierno español. Si detecta algún problema con la traducción, por favor, contacte con Infoglobal Suport, cochrane@infoglobal-suport.com.