Uterotonic agents for preventing postpartum haemorrhage: a network meta-analysis

  • New
  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Ioannis D Gallos,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Birmingham, Tommy’s National Centre for Miscarriage Research, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, Birmingham, UK
    • Ioannis D Gallos, Tommy’s National Centre for Miscarriage Research, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, C/o Academic Unit, 3rd Floor, Birmingham Women's Hospital Foundation Trust, Mindelsohn Way, Birmingham, B15 2TG, UK. i.d.gallos@bham.ac.uk. gallosioannis@gmail.com.

  • Helen M Williams,

    1. University of Birmingham, Tommy’s National Centre for Miscarriage Research, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, Birmingham, UK
  • Malcolm J Price,

    1. University of Birmingham, School of Health and Population Sciences, Birmingham, UK
  • Abi Merriel,

    1. University of Bristol, Bristol Medical School, Southmead Hospital, UK
  • Harold Gee,

    1. Birmingham, UK
  • David Lissauer,

    1. University of Birmingham, School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Birmingham, UK
  • Vidhya Moorthy,

    1. Sandwell and West Birmingham NHS Trust, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Birmingham, UK
  • Aurelio Tobias,

    1. University of Birmingham, Tommy’s National Centre for Miscarriage Research, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, Birmingham, UK
  • Jonathan J Deeks,

    1. University of Birmingham, Institute of Applied Health Research, Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
  • Mariana Widmer,

    1. World Health Organization, UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP), Department of Reproductive Health and Research, Geneva, Switzerland
  • Özge Tunçalp,

    1. World Health Organization, UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP), Department of Reproductive Health and Research, Geneva, Switzerland
  • Ahmet Metin Gülmezoglu,

    1. World Health Organization, UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP), Department of Reproductive Health and Research, Geneva, Switzerland
  • G Justus Hofmeyr,

    1. Walter Sisulu University, University of the Witwatersrand, Eastern Cape Department of Health, East London, South Africa
  • Arri Coomarasamy

    1. University of Birmingham, Tommy’s National Centre for Miscarriage Research, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, Birmingham, UK

Abstract

Background

Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Prophylactic uterotonic drugs can prevent PPH, and are routinely recommended. There are several uterotonic drugs for preventing PPH but it is still debatable which drug is best.

Objectives

To identify the most effective uterotonic drug(s) to prevent PPH, and generate a ranking according to their effectiveness and side-effect profile.

Search methods

We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth’s Trials Register (1 June 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for unpublished trial reports (30 June 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies.

Selection criteria

All randomised controlled comparisons or cluster trials of effectiveness or side-effects of uterotonic drugs for preventing PPH.

Quasi-randomised trials and cross-over trials are not eligible for inclusion in this review.

Data collection and analysis

At least three review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We estimated the relative effects and rankings for preventing PPH ≥ 500 mL and PPH ≥ 1000 mL as primary outcomes. We performed pairwise meta-analyses and network meta-analysis to determine the relative effects and rankings of all available drugs. We stratified our primary outcomes according to mode of birth, prior risk of PPH, healthcare setting, dosage, regimen and route of drug administration, to detect subgroup effects.The absolute risks in the oxytocin are based on meta-analyses of proportions from the studies included in this review and the risks in the intervention groups were based on the assumed risk in the oxytocin group and the relative effects of the interventions.

Main results

This network meta-analysis included 140 randomised trials with data from 88,947 women. There are two large ongoing studies. The trials were mostly carried out in hospital settings and recruited women who were predominantly more than 37 weeks of gestation having a vaginal birth. The majority of trials were assessed to have uncertain risk of bias due to poor reporting of study design. This primarily impacted on our confidence in comparisons involving carbetocin trials more than other uterotonics.

The three most effective drugs for prevention of PPH ≥ 500 mL were ergometrine plus oxytocin combination, carbetocin, and misoprostol plus oxytocin combination. These three options were more effective at preventing PPH ≥ 500 mL compared with oxytocin, the drug currently recommended by the WHO (ergometrine plus oxytocin risk ratio (RR) 0.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 0.83), moderate-quality evidence; carbetocin RR 0.72 (95% CI 0.52 to 1.00), very low-quality evidence; misoprostol plus oxytocin RR 0.73 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.90), moderate-quality evidence). Based on these results, about 10.5% women given oxytocin would experience a PPH of ≥ 500 mL compared with 7.2% given ergometrine plus oxytocin combination, 7.6% given carbetocin, and 7.7% given misoprostol plus oxytocin. Oxytocin was ranked fourth with close to 0% cumulative probability of being ranked in the top three for PPH ≥ 500 mL.

The outcomes and rankings for the outcome of PPH ≥ 1000 mL were similar to those of PPH ≥ 500 mL. with the evidence for ergometrine plus oxytocin combination being more effective than oxytocin (RR 0.77 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.95), high-quality evidence) being more certain than that for carbetocin (RR 0.70 (95% CI 0.38 to 1.28), low-quality evidence), or misoprostol plus oxytocin combination (RR 0.90 (95% CI 0.72 to 1.14), moderate-quality evidence)

There were no meaningful differences between all drugs for maternal deaths or severe morbidity as these outcomes were so rare in the included randomised trials.

Two combination regimens had the poorest rankings for side-effects. Specifically, the ergometrine plus oxytocin combination had the higher risk for vomiting (RR 3.10 (95% CI 2.11 to 4.56), high-quality evidence; 1.9% versus 0.6%) and hypertension [RR 1.77 (95% CI 0.55 to 5.66), low-quality evidence; 1.2% versus 0.7%), while the misoprostol plus oxytocin combination had the higher risk for fever (RR 3.18 (95% CI 2.22 to 4.55), moderate-quality evidence; 11.4% versus 3.6%) when compared with oxytocin. Carbetocin had similar risk for side-effects compared with oxytocin although the quality evidence was very low for vomiting and for fever, and was low for hypertension.

Authors' conclusions

Ergometrine plus oxytocin combination, carbetocin, and misoprostol plus oxytocin combination were more effective for preventing PPH ≥ 500 mL than the current standard oxytocin. Ergometrine plus oxytocin combination was more effective for preventing PPH ≥ 1000 mL than oxytocin. Misoprostol plus oxytocin combination evidence is less consistent and may relate to different routes and doses of misoprostol used in the studies. Carbetocin had the most favourable side-effect profile amongst the top three options; however, most carbetocin trials were small and at high risk of bias.

Amongst the 11 ongoing studies listed in this review there are two key studies that will inform a future update of this review. The first is a WHO-led multi-centre study comparing the effectiveness of a room temperature stable carbetocin versus oxytocin (administered intramuscularly) for preventing PPH in women having a vaginal birth. The trial includes around 30,000 women from 10 countries. The other is a UK-based trial recruiting more than 6000 women to a three-arm trial comparing carbetocin, oxytocin and ergometrine plus oxytocin combination. Both trials are expected to report in 2018.

Consultation with our consumer group demonstrated the need for more research into PPH outcomes identified as priorities for women and their families, such as women’s views regarding the drugs used, clinical signs of excessive blood loss, neonatal unit admissions and breastfeeding at discharge. To date, trials have rarely investigated these outcomes. Consumers also considered the side-effects of uterotonic drugs to be important but these were often not reported. A forthcoming set of core outcomes relating to PPH will identify outcomes to prioritise in trial reporting and will inform futures updates of this review. We urge all trialists to consider measuring these outcomes for each drug in all future randomised trials. Lastly, future evidence synthesis research could compare the effects of different dosages and routes of administration for the most effective drugs.

Resumen

Agentes uterotónicos para la prevención de la hemorragia posparto: un metanálisis en red

Antecedentes

La hemorragia posparto (HPP) es la causa principal de mortalidad materna en todo el mundo. Los fármacos uterotónicos profilácticos pueden prevenir la HPP y se recomiendan de manera sistemática. Hay varios fármacos uterotónicos para prevenir la HPP, pero aún es motivo de debate qué fármaco es mejor.

Objetivos

Identificar el/los fármaco/s uterotónico/s más efectivo/s para prevenir la HPP y establecer una jerarquización según su efectividad y el perfil de efectos secundarios.

Métodos de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas de informes de ensayos no publicados en el registro de ensayos del Grupo Cochrane de Embarazo y Parto (Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth’s Trials Register) (1 junio 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov y en la World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (30 junio 2015) y en las listas de referencias de los estudios recuperados.

Criterios de selección

Todas las comparaciones de ensayos controlados aleatorios o ensayos grupales de la efectividad o los efectos secundarios de los fármacos uterotónicos para prevenir la HPP.

Los ensayos cuasialeatorios y cruzados no fueron aptos para la inclusión en esta revisión.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Al menos tres autores de la revisión evaluaron de forma independiente los ensayos para la inclusión y el riesgo de sesgo, extrajeron los datos y verificaron su exactitud. Se calcularon los efectos relativos y se establecieron jerarquizaciones para la prevención de la HPP ≥ 500 ml y la HPP ≥ 1000 ml como resultados primarios. Se realizaron metanálisis pareados y metanálisis en red para determinar los efectos relativos y establecer las jerarquizaciones de todos los fármacos disponibles. Los resultados primarios se estratificaron según la forma del parto, el riesgo previo de HPP, el contexto de asistencia sanitaria, la dosis, el régimen y la vía de administración de los fármacos, para detectar los efectos de subgrupos. Los riesgos absolutos de la oxitocina se basan en metanálisis de las proporciones de los estudios incluidos en esta revisión y los riesgos en los grupos de intervención se basaron en el riesgo supuesto en el grupo de oxitocina y los efectos relativos de las intervenciones.

Resultados principales

Este metanálisis en red incluyó 140 ensayos aleatorios con datos de 88 947 pacientes. Hay dos grandes estudios en curso. Los ensayos se realizaron sobre todo en ámbitos hospitalarios e incorporaron en su mayoría a pacientes con más de 37 semanas de gestación y con un parto vaginal. La mayoría de los ensayos se consideraron con riesgo incierto de sesgo debido al informe deficiente del diseño de los estudios. Lo anterior repercutió principalmente en la confianza en las comparaciones que incluyeron los ensayos de carbetocina, más que otros uterotónicos.

Los tres fármacos más efectivos para la prevención de la HPP ≥ 500 ml fueron la combinación ergometrina más oxitocina, la carbetocina y la combinación de misoprostol más oxitocina. Estas tres opciones fueron más efectivas en la prevención de la HPP ≥ 500 ml en comparación con oxitocina, el fármaco actualmente recomendado por la OMS (ergometrina más oxitocina, cociente de riesgos [CR] 0,69; intervalo de confianza [IC] del 95%: 0,57 a 0,83, evidencia de calidad moderada; carbetocina, CR 0,72; IC del 95%: 0,52 a 1,00, evidencia de muy baja calidad; misoprostol más oxitocina, CR 0,73; IC del 95%: 0,60 a 0,90, evidencia de calidad moderada). Según estos resultados, cerca del 10,5% de las pacientes que recibieron oxitocina tendrían una HPP ≥ 500 ml, en comparación con el 7,2% de las que recibieron la combinación ergometrina más oxitocina, el 7,6% de las que recibieron carbetocina y el 7,7% de las que recibieron misoprostol más oxitocina. La oxitocina se calificó cuarta, con una probabilidad acumulativa de cerca del 0% de calificarse en las tres mejores para la HPP ≥ 500 ml.

Los resultados y las jerarquizaciones para el resultado HPP ≥ 1000 ml fueron similares a los de la HPP ≥ 500 ml; la confianza en la evidencia de que la combinación ergometrina más oxitocina fue más efectiva que la oxitocina (CR 0,77; IC del 95%: 0,61 a 0,95, evidencia de alta calidad) fue mayor que para la carbetocina (CR 0,70; IC del 95%: 0,38 a 1,28, evidencia de baja calidad), o la combinación misoprostol más oxitocina (CR 0,90; IC del 95%: 0,72 a 1,14, evidencia de calidad moderada)

No hubo diferencias significativas entre los fármacos en las muertes maternas ni en la morbilidad grave, ya que estos resultados fueron muy poco frecuentes en los ensayos aleatorios incluidos.

Dos regímenes de combinación tuvieron jerarquizaciones más deficientes para los efectos secundarios. Específicamente, la combinación ergometrina más oxitocina tuvo el riesgo mayor de vómitos (CR 3,10; IC del 95%: 2,11 a 4,56, evidencia de alta calidad; 1,9% versus 0,6%) e hipertensión (CR 1,77; IC del 95%: 0,55 a 5,66, evidencia de baja calidad; 1,2% versus 0,7%), mientras que la combinación misoprostol más oxitocina tuvo el riesgo mayor de fiebre (CR 3,18; IC del 95%: 2,22 a 4,55, evidencia de calidad moderada; 11,4% versus 3,6%) en comparación con la oxitocina. La carbetocina tuvo un riesgo similar de efectos secundarios en comparación con la oxitocina, aunque la evidencia fue de muy baja calidad para el vómito y la fiebre, y de baja calidad para la hipertensión.

Conclusiones de los autores

La combinación ergometrina más oxitocina, la carbetocina y la combinación misoprostol más oxitocina fueron más efectivas para prevenir la HPP ≥ 500 ml que el estándar actual oxitocina. La combinación ergometrina más oxitocina fue más efectiva para la prevención de la HPP ≥ 1000 ml que la oxitocina. La evidencia para la combinación misoprostol más oxitocina es menos consistente y puede estar relacionada con las diferentes vías y dosis de misoprostol utilizadas en los estudios. La carbetocina tuvo el perfil de efectos secundarios más favorable entre las tres opciones mejores; sin embargo, la mayoría de los ensayos de carbetocina fueron pequeños y con alto riesgo de sesgo.

Entre los 11 estudios en curso enumerados en esta revisión hay dos estudios clave que informarán la actualización futura de esta revisión. El primero es un estudio multicéntrico realizado por la OMS que compara la efectividad de una carbetocina estable a temperatura ambiente versus oxitocina (administrada por vía intramuscular) para prevenir la HPP en pacientes con un parto vaginal. El ensayo incluye alrededor de 30 000 pacientes de diez países. El otro es un ensayo del Reino Unido que reclutó más de 6000 pacientes en un ensayo de tres brazos que comparó carbetocina, oxitocina y la combinación ergometrina más oxitocina. Se espera que ambos ensayos se informen en 2018.

La consulta con el grupo de consumidores demostró la necesidad de más estudios de investigación sobre los resultados de la HPP identificados como prioridades para las pacientes y sus familiares, como las opiniones de las pacientes con respecto a los fármacos utilizados, los signos clínicos de pérdida sanguínea excesiva, los ingresos en unidades neonatales y la lactancia al momento del alta. Hasta la fecha, los ensayos han investigado en pocas ocasiones estos resultados. Los consumidores también consideraron que los efectos secundarios de los fármacos uterotónicos eran importantes, pero a menudo no se no informaron. Un próximo grupo de resultados principales relacionados con la HPP identificará los resultados a priorizar en el informe de los ensayos e informará las actualizaciones futuras de esta revisión. Se estimula a todos los investigadores a que consideren la posibilidad de medir estos resultados para cada fármaco en todos los ensayos aleatorios futuros. Finalmente, los estudios de investigación futuros de síntesis de la evidencia podrían comparar los efectos de diferentes dosis y vías de administración para los fármacos más efectivos.

Plain language summary

Which drug is best for reducing excessive blood loss after birth?

What is the issue?

The aim of this Cochrane review was to find out which drug is most effective in preventing excessive blood loss at childbirth and has the least side-effects. We collected and analysed all the relevant studies to answer this question.

Why is this important?

Bleeding after birth is the most common reason why mothers die in childbirth worldwide. Although most healthy women can cope well with some bleeding at childbirth, others do not, and this can pose a serious risk to their health and even life. To reduce excessive bleeding at childbirth, the routine administration of a drug to contract the uterus (uterotonic) has become standard practice across the world. The aim of this research was to identify which drug is most effective in preventing excessive bleeding after childbirth with the least side-effects.

Different drugs given routinely at childbirth have been used for preventing excessive bleeding. They include oxytocin, misoprostol, ergometrine, carbetocin, and combinations of these drugs, each with different effectiveness and side-effects. Some of the side-effects identified include: vomiting, high blood pressure and fever. We analysed all the available evidence to compare all of these drugs and calculated a ranking among them, providing robust effectiveness and side-effect profiles for each drug.

What evidence did we find?

We searched for evidence in June 2015 and found 140 studies involving a total of 88,947 women. The results suggest that an ergometrine plus oxytocin combination, carbetocin, and a misoprostol plus oxytocin combination are the most effective drugs for preventing excessive bleeding after childbirth and are more effective than the drug oxytocin currently recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, ergometrine plus oxytocin and misoprostol plus oxytocin were the worst drugs for side-effects, with carbetocin having the most favourable side-effect profile (less vomiting, high blood pressure and fever). More effective drugs could probably prevent one out of three women from bleeding excessively after childbirth compared to oxytocin. However, existing carbetocin studies were small and of poor quality.

What does this mean?

We found that ergometrine plus oxytocin, misoprostol plus oxytocin, and carbetocin were more effective drugs for reducing excessive bleeding at childbirth than oxytocin which is the current standard drug used to prevent this condition. Carbetocin has the least side-effects among the top three drug options, but to date studies of carbetocin were small and of poor quality.

There are some ongoing studies that are not yet complete, including two key studies. One is a large study (involving around 30,000 women across 10 different countries) comparing the effectiveness of carbetocin versus oxytocin for preventing PPH among women having a vaginal birth. The other is a UK-based trial (involving more than 6000 women) comparing carbetocin, oxytocin and ergometrine plus oxytocin combination. Both trials are expected to report in 2018 and these results will be incorporated when this review is updated.

Consultation with our consumer group has demonstrated a need for more research into PPH outcomes identified as priorities for women and their families, such as women’s views regarding the drugs used, clinical signs of excessive blood loss, neonatal unit admissions and breastfeeding at discharge. Trials to date have rarely investigated these outcomes. Consumers also considered the side-effects of uterotonic drugs to be important and these were often not reported. A set of standardised PPH outcomes are being developed and will be incorporated in future updates of this review. We would hope that future trials would also consider adopting those outcomes. Finally, future systematic reviews could compare the effects of different doses and ways of administering the most effective drugs.

平易な要約

出産後の多量出血を減らすために最も良い薬剤は何か?

論点

このコクラン レビューの目的は、分娩時の多量出血を予防するために最も有効で副作用が最も少ない薬剤は何かを見つけることである。この疑問に答えるために関連があると考えられたあらゆる試験結果を収集した。

重要である理由

分娩後の出血は、世界中で最も一般的な、分娩時に母体死亡をもたらす原因である。ほとんどの健康的な女性は、分娩時の出血に対応できるが、そうでない場合は、健康や生命に深刻な危険をもたらす。分娩時の大量出血を減らすため、子宮を収縮させる薬 (子宮收縮薬) のルーチンでの使用は、世界中で標準的な医療行為となっている。この研究の目的は、分娩時の多量出血を予防するために、最も有効かつ副作用が最も少ない薬剤は何かを同定することである。

多量出血を防止するために、分娩時にさまざまな薬剤がルーチンで使用されている。それらの薬剤には、オキシトシン、ミソプロストール、エルゴメトリン、カルベトシン、そしてこれらの併用などがあり、それぞれ異なる有効性と副作用を持つ。これまでに分かっている副作用には、 嘔吐、高血圧、発熱がある。これら全ての薬剤を比較し、ランキングを算出することで、各薬剤におけるしっかりとした有効性と副作用の分析結果を示すために、利用可能なすべてのエビデンスを分析した。

どのようなエビデンスが得られたか?

2015 年 6 月までのエビデンスを検索し、88,947 人を含む 140の研究を見つけた。エルゴメトリンとオキシトシンの併用、カルベトシン、およびミソプロストールとオキシトシンの併用が、分娩後の多量出血を予防するために最も効果的な薬であることが本研究結果より示唆された。これは、世界保健機関 (WHO) で現在勧告されているオキシトシンよりも効果的である。しかし、副作用の面でもっとも優れている(嘔吐、高血圧、発熱の発生が少ない) カルベトシンに比べると、エルゴメトリンとオキシトシンの組み合わせと、ミソプロ ストールとオキシトシンの組み合わせは、最も副作用が大きかった。オキシトシンと比較して、有効性の高い薬剤は、おそらく3 人に1 人の女性を分娩の多量出血から防ぐことができる。しかし、既存のカルベトシンに関する研究は、サンプルサイズも小さく、精度も低い試験だった。

意味するもの

分娩後の多量出血予防における現在の標準薬剤であるオキシトシンよりも、エルゴメトリンとオキシトシンの併用、ミソプロ ストールとオキシトシンの併用、カルベトシンは、分娩時の多量出血を減らすためのより効果的な薬剤であることが分かった。カルベトシンは上位3つの薬剤の中で最も副作用が小さかったが、これまでのところ、カルベトシンの試験のサンプルサイズが小さく精度が低かった。

2つの主要な試験を含む、進行中の試験がいくつかある。1つは、経腟分娩後の出血予防を目的としたカルベトシンとオキシトシンの有効性の比較を行う大規模試験 (10ヵ国の約30,000人を対象) である。もう1つは、 カルベトシン、オキシトシン、エルゴメトリンとオキシトシンの併用を比較する英国主導の試験 (6,000 人以上を含む)である。これら2つの試験結果は2018 年に報告されることが期待され、このレビューのアップデート版にこれらの結果を組み込む予定である。

消費者グループとの協議では、使用する薬剤に関する女性の見解、多量出血の臨床症状、新生児室入室や退院時の母乳育児などといった、女性やその家族にとって優先順位が高いと考えられるようなアウトカムを考慮した、分娩後出血に関するさらなる試験の必要性が示された。これまでの試験では、これらのアウトカムはほとんど検討されていない。消費者も子宮收縮薬の副作用は重要と捉えており、これらはあまり報告されてこなかった。標準的な分娩後出血のアウトカム設定は現在検討中であり、このレビューのアップデート版に組み込まれる予定である。今後の試験でも、これらのアウトカムが設定されるよう期待する。最後に、今後のシステマティックレビューでは、最も効果的な薬剤の、異なる投与量や投与方法の有効性について比較ができるだろう。

訳注

《実施組織》増澤祐子 翻訳、重見大介 監訳[2018.5.1] 《注意》この日本語訳は、臨床医、疫学研究者などによる翻訳のチェックを受けて公開していますが、訳語の間違いなどお気づきの点がございましたら、コクランジャパンまでご連絡ください。なお、2013年6月からコクラン・ライブラリーのNew review, Updated reviewとも日単位で更新されています。最新版の日本語訳を掲載するよう努めておりますが、タイム・ラグが生じている場合もあります。ご利用に際しては、最新版(英語版)の内容をご確認ください。  《CD011689》

Resumen en términos sencillos

¿Qué fármaco es mejor para reducir la pérdida sanguínea excesiva después del parto?

¿Cuál es el problema?

El objetivo de esta revisión Cochrane fue determinar qué fármaco es más efectivo para prevenir la pérdida sanguínea excesiva en el momento del parto y tiene los efectos secundarios mínimos. Se recopilaron y analizaron todos los estudios relevantes para responder esta pregunta.

¿Por qué es esto importante?

La hemorragia después del parto es el motivo más frecuente por el que las madres mueren durante el parto en todo el mundo. Aunque la mayoría de las mujeres sanas pueden afrontar bien cierta hemorragia durante el parto, otras no lo logran, lo que puede entrañar un grave riesgo para su salud y su vida. Para reducir la hemorragia excesiva durante el parto, la administración habitual de un fármaco para contraer el útero (uterotónico) se ha convertido en práctica generalizada en todo el mundo. El objetivo de esta investigación fue identificar qué fármaco es más efectivo para prevenir la hemorragia excesiva después del parto con los efectos secundarios mínimos.

Para prevenir la hemorragia excesiva se han utilizado diferentes fármacos administrados de manera habitual durante el parto. Incluyen oxitocina, misoprostol, ergometrina, carbetocina y combinaciones de esos fármacos, cada uno con diferente efectividad y efectos secundarios. Algunos de los efectos secundarios identificados incluyen: vómitos, hipertensión y fiebre. Se analizó toda la evidencia disponible para comparar todos estos fármacos y se estableció una jerarquización entre ellos, lo que proporcionó perfiles consistentes de efectividad y efectos secundarios para cada fármaco.

¿Qué evidencia se encontró?

Se buscó evidencia en junio de 2015 y se encontraron 140 estudios con un total de 88 947 mujeres. Los resultados indican que una combinación de ergometrina más oxitocina, la carbetocina y una combinación de misoprostol más oxitocina son los fármacos más efectivos para prevenir la hemorragia excesiva después del parto y son más efectivos que el fármaco oxitocina actualmente recomendado por la Organización Mundial de la Salud (WHO). Sin embargo, ergometrina más oxitocina y misoprostol más oxitocina fueron los peores fármacos con respecto a los efectos secundarios, y la carbetocina tuvo el perfil de efectos secundarios más favorable (menos vómitos, hipertensión y fiebre). Los fármacos más efectivos probablemente podrían impedir que una de cada tres pacientes sangre en exceso después del parto, en comparación con la oxitocina. Sin embargo, los estudios de carbetocina existentes fueron pequeños y de calidad deficiente.

¿Qué significa esto?

Se encontró que ergometrina más oxitocina, misoprostol más oxitocina y la carbetocina fueron fármacos más efectivos para reducir la hemorragia excesiva durante el parto que la oxitocina, que es el fármaco estándar actual que se utiliza para prevenir esta afección. La carbetocina tiene los efectos secundarios mínimos entre las tres opciones principales de fármacos, pero hasta la fecha los estudios de carbetocina han sido pequeños y de calidad deficiente.

Hay algunos estudios en curso que aún no están completos, incluidos dos estudios clave. Uno es un estudio grande (que incluyó alrededor de 30 000 mujeres en diez países diferentes) que compara la efectividad de carbetocina versus oxitocina para prevenir la HPP en pacientes que tuvieron un parto vaginal. El otro es un ensayo en el Reino Unido (que incluyó más de 6000 mujeres) que compara carbetocina, oxitocina y la combinación ergometrina más oxitocina. Se espera que ambos ensayos se informen en 2018 y estos resultados se incorporarán cuando se actualice esta revisión.

La consulta con el grupo de consumidores ha demostrado la necesidad de más estudios de investigación sobre los resultados de la HPP identificados como prioridades para las pacientes y sus familiares, como las opiniones de las pacientes con respecto a los fármacos utilizados, los signos clínicos de pérdida sanguínea excesiva, los ingresos en las unidades neonatales y la lactancia al momento del alta. Los ensayos realizados hasta la fecha han investigado en pocas ocasiones estos resultados. Los consumidores también consideraron que los efectos secundarios de los fármacos uterotónicos eran importantes y que a menudo no se informan. Actualmente se desarrolla un grupo de resultados estandarizados de la HPP que se incorporará en las actualizaciones futuras de esta revisión. Es de esperar que los ensayos futuros también consideren la posibilidad de adoptar dichos resultados. Finalmente, las revisiones sistemáticas futuras podrían comparar los efectos de diferentes dosis y vías de administración de los fármacos más efectivos.

Notas de traducción

La traducción y edición de las revisiones Cochrane han sido realizadas bajo la responsabilidad del Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano, gracias a la suscripción efectuada por el Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad del Gobierno español. Si detecta algún problema con la traducción, por favor, contacte con Infoglobal Suport, cochrane@infoglobal-suport.com.