Workplace interventions for reducing sitting at work

  • Conclusions changed
  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors


Abstract

Background

A large number of people are employed in sedentary occupations. Physical inactivity and excessive sitting at workplaces have been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and all-cause mortality.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness of workplace interventions to reduce sitting at work compared to no intervention or alternative interventions.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, OSH UPDATE, PsycINFO, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) search portal up to 9 August 2017. We also screened reference lists of articles and contacted authors to find more studies.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cross-over RCTs, cluster-randomised controlled trials (cluster-RCTs), and quasi-RCTs of interventions to reduce sitting at work. For changes of workplace arrangements, we also included controlled before-and-after studies. The primary outcome was time spent sitting at work per day, either self-reported or measured using devices such as an accelerometer-inclinometer and duration and number of sitting bouts lasting 30 minutes or more. We considered energy expenditure, total time spent sitting (including sitting at and outside work), time spent standing at work, work productivity and adverse events as secondary outcomes.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently screened titles, abstracts and full-text articles for study eligibility. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We contacted authors for additional data where required.

Main results

We found 34 studies — including two cross-over RCTs, 17 RCTs, seven cluster-RCTs, and eight controlled before-and-after studies — with a total of 3,397 participants, all from high-income countries. The studies evaluated physical workplace changes (16 studies), workplace policy changes (four studies), information and counselling (11 studies), and multi-component interventions (four studies). One study included both physical workplace changes and information and counselling components. We did not find any studies that specifically investigated the effects of standing meetings or walking meetings on sitting time.

Physical workplace changes

Interventions using sit-stand desks, either alone or in combination with information and counselling, reduced sitting time at work on average by 100 minutes per workday at short-term follow-up (up to three months) compared to sit-desks (95% confidence interval (CI) −116 to −84, 10 studies, low-quality evidence). The pooled effect of two studies showed sit-stand desks reduced sitting time at medium-term follow-up (3 to 12 months) by an average of 57 minutes per day (95% CI −99 to −15) compared to sit-desks. Total sitting time (including sitting at and outside work) also decreased with sit-stand desks compared to sit-desks (mean difference (MD) −82 minutes/day, 95% CI −124 to −39, two studies) as did the duration of sitting bouts lasting 30 minutes or more (MD −53 minutes/day, 95% CI −79 to −26, two studies, very low-quality evidence).

We found no significant difference between the effects of standing desks and sit-stand desks on reducing sitting at work. Active workstations, such as treadmill desks or cycling desks, had unclear or inconsistent effects on sitting time.

Workplace policy changes

We found no significant effects for implementing walking strategies on workplace sitting time at short-term (MD −15 minutes per day, 95% CI −50 to 19, low-quality evidence, one study) and medium-term (MD −17 minutes/day, 95% CI −61 to 28, one study) follow-up. Short breaks (one to two minutes every half hour) reduced time spent sitting at work on average by 40 minutes per day (95% CI −66 to −15, one study, low-quality evidence) compared to long breaks (two 15-minute breaks per workday) at short-term follow-up.

Information and counselling

Providing information, feedback, counselling, or all of these resulted in no significant change in time spent sitting at work at short-term follow-up (MD −19 minutes per day, 95% CI −57 to 19, two studies, low-quality evidence). However, the reduction was significant at medium-term follow-up (MD −28 minutes per day, 95% CI −51 to −5, two studies, low-quality evidence).

Computer prompts combined with information resulted in no significant change in sitting time at work at short-term follow-up (MD −10 minutes per day, 95% CI −45 to 24, two studies, low-quality evidence), but at medium-term follow-up they produced a significant reduction (MD −55 minutes per day, 95% CI −96 to −14, one study). Furthermore, computer prompting resulted in a significant decrease in the average number (MD −1.1, 95% CI −1.9 to −0.3, one study) and duration (MD -74 minutes per day, 95% CI −124 to −24, one study) of sitting bouts lasting 30 minutes or more.

Computer prompts with instruction to stand reduced sitting at work on average by 14 minutes per day (95% CI 10 to 19, one study) more than computer prompts with instruction to walk at least 100 steps at short-term follow-up.

We found no significant reduction in workplace sitting time at medium-term follow-up following mindfulness training (MD −23 minutes per day, 95% CI −63 to 17, one study, low-quality evidence). Similarly a single study reported no change in sitting time at work following provision of highly personalised or contextualised information and less personalised or contextualised information. One study found no significant effects of activity trackers on sitting time at work.

Multi-component interventions

Combining multiple interventions had significant but heterogeneous effects on sitting time at work (573 participants, three studies, very low-quality evidence) and on time spent in prolonged sitting bouts (two studies, very low-quality evidence) at short-term follow-up.

Authors' conclusions

At present there is low-quality evidence that the use of sit-stand desks reduce workplace sitting at short-term and medium-term follow-ups. However, there is no evidence on their effects on sitting over longer follow-up periods. Effects of other types of interventions, including workplace policy changes, provision of information and counselling, and multi-component interventions, are mostly inconsistent. The quality of evidence is low to very low for most interventions, mainly because of limitations in study protocols and small sample sizes. There is a need for larger cluster-RCTs with longer-term follow-ups to determine the effectiveness of different types of interventions to reduce sitting time at work.

Plain language summary

Workplace interventions (methods) for reducing time spent sitting at work

Why is the amount of time spent sitting at work important?

Time spent sitting and being physically inactive at work has increased in recent decades. Long periods of sitting may increase the risk of obesity, heart disease, and premature death. It is unclear whether interventions that aim to reduce sitting at workplaces are effective.

The purpose of this review

We wanted to find out the effects of interventions aimed at reducing sitting time at work. We searched the literature in various databases up to 9 August 2017.

What trials did the review find?

We found 34 studies conducted with a total of 3,397 employees from high-income countries. Sixteen studies evaluated physical changes in the workplace design and environment, four studies evaluated changes in workplace policies, 10 studies evaluated information and counselling interventions, and four studies evaluated multi-category interventions.

Effect of sit-stand desks

The use of sit-stand desks seems to reduce workplace sitting on average by 84 to 116 minutes per day. When combined with the provision of information and counselling, the use of sit-stand desks seems to result in similar reductions in sitting at work. Sit-stand desks also seem to reduce total sitting time (including sitting at work and outside work) and the duration of workplace sitting bouts that last 30 minutes or longer. One study compared standing desks and sit-stand desks but due to the small number of employees included, it does not provide enough evidence to determine which type of desk is more effective at reducing sitting time.

Effect of active workstations

Treadmill desks combined with counselling seem to reduce sitting time at work, while the available evidence is insufficient to conclude whether cycling desks combined with the provision of information reduce sitting at work more than the provision of information alone.

Effect of walking during breaks or length of breaks

The available evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of walking during breaks in reducing sitting time. Taking short breaks (one to two minutes every half hour) seems to reduce time spent sitting at work by 15 to 66 minutes per day more than taking long breaks (two 15-minute breaks per workday).

Effect of information and counselling

Providing information, feedback, counselling, or all of these reduces sitting time at medium-term follow-up (3 to 12 months after the intervention) on average by 5 to 51 minutes per day. The available evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions about the effects at short-term follow-up (up to three months after the intervention). The use of computer prompts combined with providing information reduces sitting time in the medium-term on average by 14 to 96 minutes per day. The available evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions about the effects in the short-term.

One study found that prompts to stand reduce sitting time more than prompts to step, on average by 10 to 19 minutes per day.

The available evidence is insufficient to conclude whether providing highly personalised or contextualised information is more or less effective than providing less personalised or contextualised information in reducing siting time at work. The available evidence is also insufficient to draw conclusions about the effect of mindfulness training and the use of activity trackers on sitting at work.

Effect of combining multiple interventions

Combining multiple interventions seems to be effective in reducing sitting time and time spent in prolonged sitting bouts in the short-term and the medium-term. However, this evidence comes from only a small number of studies and the effects were very different across the studies.

Conclusions

The quality of evidence is low to very low for most interventions, mainly because of limitations in study protocols and small sample sizes. At present there is low-quality evidence that sit-stand desks may reduce sitting at work in the first year of their use. However, the effects are likely to reduce with time. There is generally insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about such effects for other types of interventions and for the effectiveness of reducing workplace sitting over periods longer than one year. More research is needed to assess the effectiveness of different types of interventions for reducing sitting at workplaces, particularly over longer periods.

Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Maßnahmen (Methoden) am Arbeitsplatz zur Verringerung der Sitzdauer bei der Arbeit

Warum ist die Dauer der bei der Arbeit im Sitzen verbrachten Zeit bedeutsam?

In den vergangenen Jahrzehnten hat die im Sitzen und in körperlicher Inaktivität verbrachte Zeit bei der Arbeit zugenommen. Lange Sitzphasen steigern das Risiko für Fettleibigkeit, Herzerkrankungen und einen frühzeitigen Tod. Es ist unklar, ob Maßnahmen zur Verringerung des Sitzens am Arbeitsplatz wirksam sind.

Ziel dieses Reviews

Wir wollten die Wirkungen von Maßnahmen zur Verringerung der im Sitzen verbrachten Arbeitszeit ermitteln. Wir führten eine Literatursuche in verschiedenen Datenbanken bis zum 9. August 2017 durch.

Welche Studien wurden in diesem Review gefunden?

Wir fanden 34 Studien, die mit insgesamt 3397 Beschäftigten aus einkommensstarken Ländern durchgeführt wurden. Sechzehn Studien untersuchten Veränderungen der Gestaltung des Arbeitsplatzes und dessen Umgebung (z.B. spezielle Tische), vier Studien untersuchten Veränderungen von Arbeitsplatzrichtlinien (z.B. Übungsgruppen während der Arbeitszeit), zehn Studien untersuchten Informations- und Beratungsmaßnahmen, und vier Studien untersuchten Maßnahmen, die mehrere Komponenten beinhalteten.

Die Wirkung von ‚Sitz-Steh-Tischen‘

Der Einsatz von ‚Sitz-Steh-Tischen‘ (höhenverstellbaren Tischen, an denen wahlweise im Sitzen oder Stehen gearbeitet werden kann) scheint das Sitzen am Arbeitsplatz um durchschnittliche 84 bis 116 Minuten am Tag zu verringern. Der Einsatz von ‚Sitz-Steh-Tischen‘ scheint zu einer ähnlichen Verringerung der Sitzdauer bei der Arbeit zu führen, wenn er mit der Bereitstellung von Informationen und Beratung kombiniert wird. ‚Sitz-Steh-Tische‘ scheinen zudem die Gesamt-Sitzdauer (während und außerhalb der Arbeit) und die Dauer von Sitzphasen von 30 Minuten oder länger zu verringern. Eine Studie verglich Steh-Tische und ‚Sitz-Steh-Tische‘; aufgrund der geringen Teilnehmerzahl liefert diese Studie jedoch keine ausreichende Evidenz (keinen ausreichenden wissenschaftlichen Beleg) für die Entscheidung, welche Art von Tisch für die Verringerung der Sitzdauer während der Arbeit wirksamer ist.

Die Wirkung von aktiven Arbeitsstationen

Die Kombination von ‚Laufbandschreibtischen‘ (Kombinationen aus Tisch und Laufband, die das Gehen während des Arbeitens ermöglichen) und Beratung scheint die Sitzdauer während der Arbeit zu verringern, allerdings ist die verfügbare Evidenz unzureichend, um daraus Schlüsse ziehen zu können, ob ‚Fahrradtische‘ (Arbeitsstationen mit Pedalen) in Kombination mit Informationen die Sitzdauer während der Arbeit mehr verringert als Informationen allein.

Die Wirkung von ‚Walking‘ während Pausen oder Pausendauer

Die verfügbare Evidenz ist unzureichend, um daraus Schlüsse zur Wirksamkeit von ‚Walking‘ während Pausen in Bezug auf die Verringerung der Sitzdauer ziehen zu können. Kurze Pausen (ein oder zwei Minuten alle halbe Stunde) scheinen die Sitzdauer während der Arbeit um 15 bis 66 Minuten mehr pro Tag zu verringern als lange Pausen (zwei 15-minütige Pausen je Arbeitstag).

Die Wirkung von Informationen und Beratung

Die Bereitstellung von Informationen, Feedback, Beratung oder diese drei Maßnahmen zusammen verringern die Sitzdauer mittelfristig (drei bis zwölf Monate nach der Maßnahme) durchschnittlich um 5 bis 51 Minuten pro Tag. Die verfügbare Evidenz ist unzureichend, um daraus Schlüsse zu den kurzfristigen Wirkungen (bis drei Monate nach der Maßnahme) ziehen zu können. Der Einsatz von über den Computer übermittelten Aufforderungen in Kombination mit Informationen verringert die Sitzdauer mittelfristig um durchschnittlich 14 bis 96 Minuten pro Tag. Die verfügbare Evidenz ist unzureichend, um daraus Schlüsse zu den kurzfristigen Wirkungen ziehen zu können.

Eine Studie ergab, dass eine über den Computer übermittelte Aufforderung zum Stehen die Sitzdauer stärker, durchschnittlich um 10 bis 19 Minuten pro Tag, verringerte als eine Aufforderung zu Schritten (bzw. zum ‚Auf-der-Stelle-Treten‘).

Die verfügbare Evidenz ist unzureichend, um daraus Schlüsse ziehen zu können, ob die Bereitstellung personalisierter oder situationsangepasster Informationen wirksamer zur Verringerung der Sitzdauer ist als die Bereitstellung weniger personalisierter oder situationsangepasster Informationen. Die verfügbare Evidenz ist außerdem unzureichend, um Schlüsse zur Wirkung von Achtsamkeits-Training und zum Einsatz von Aktivitäts-Trackern (Fitnessarmbändern, die gesundheitsrelevanten Daten aufzeichnen können) auf die Sitzdauer während der Arbeit ziehen zu können.

Die Wirkung von kombinierten Maßnahmen

Das Kombinatieren mehrerer Maßnahmen zur Verringerung des Sitzens scheint kurz- und mittelfristig wirksam zur Verringerung von Sitzdauer und langen Sitzphasen zu sein; allerdings basiert diese Evidenz auf einer geringen Anzahl von Studien mit sehr unterschiedlichen Wirkungen.

Schlussfolgerungen

Die Qualität der Evidenz ist für die meisten Maßnahmen niedrig bis sehr niedrig, hauptsächlich wegen Schwächen in den Studienprotokollen und geringer Teilnehmerzahlen. Gegenwärtig gibt es Evidenz von niedriger Qualität dafür, dass Sitz-Steh-Tische die Sitzdauer während der Arbeit im ersten Jahr ihres Einsatzes verringern können. Allerdings verringert sich diese Wirkung wahrscheinlich mit der Zeit. Insgesamt ist die Evidenz unzureichend, um Schlüsse zu den Wirkungen von Maßnahmen anderer Art und zur Wirksamkeit der Verringerung der Sitzdauer über einen Zeitraum von mehr als einem Jahr ziehen zu können. Weitere Forschung ist notwendig, um die Wirksamkeit verschiedener Arten von Maßnahmen zur Verringerung der Sitzdauer am Arbeitsplatz, insbesondere über einen längeren Zeitraum, zu ermitteln.

Anmerkungen zur Übersetzung

T. Bossmann, C. Braun, Koordination durch Cochrane Deutschland

一般語訳

仕事中に座っている時間を減らすための職場における介入 (メソッド)

座位で仕事をしている時間の長さが重要な理由

仕事中に座位で過ごし、身体を活動的に動かさない時間がここ十年間で増加している。長時間座っていると、肥満、心臓病や早期死亡のリスクを高める可能性がある。職場で座っている時間を減らすことを目的とした介入の効果については、まだわかっていない。

このレビューの目的

我々は、仕事で座っている時間を減らすことを目的とした介入の効果を知りたかった。各種データベースで2017年8月9日までの文献を検索した。

検索で同定された試験

高所得国における34の試験を同定し、合計3397人の従業員が対象となっていた。16の試験では職場のデザインや環境による介入を、4つの試験では職場の方針による介入を、10の試験では情報提供やカウンセリングによる介入を、そして4つの試験では複数の領域における介入を、それぞれ評価していた。

上下昇降デスクの効果

上下昇降デスクを使用すると、職場で座っている時間を1日当たり平均84~116分間減らす効果があるようだ。情報提供やカウンセリングの提供と組み合わせた場合、上下昇降デスクの使用は仕事で座っている時間を減らす効果は同程度のようである。上下昇降デスクは、座位で過ごす時間全体(仕事中と仕事以外を含む)や、30分以上座り続ける一仕事単位の継続時間も減らす。1つの試験では、スタンディングデスクと上下昇降デスクを比較していたが、対象となる従業員数が少なかったため、どちらのタイプが座位で過ごす時間を減らすのにより有効かを判断するのに十分なエビデンスが得られなかった。

活動的な職場環境の効果

トレッドミルができるデスクとカウンセリングの併用は仕事で座っている時間を減らすことができそうだ。一方、自転車こぎができるデスクを情報提供と併用した場合、情報提供だけを行った場合と比べて仕事で座っている時間を減らすと結論づけるには、充分なエビデンスは得られなかった。

休憩時間の長さや休憩中に歩くことの効果

得られたエビデンスからは、休憩中に歩くことで座位の時間を減らすことへの有効性について、結論を導き出せなかった。短い休憩をこまめに取る(30分ごとに1~2分の休憩)方法は、長い休憩を取る(勤務時間中に2回の15分休憩)方法に比べて、座位で仕事をする時間を1日あたり15~66分多く減らすことができそうだ。

情報提供とカウンセリングの効果

情報を提供すること、フィードバックすること、カウンセリング、またはこれらすべては、中期的なフォローアップ中(介入から3~12か月後)の座位で仕事をする時間を減らせた。その平均時間は1日あたり5~51分であった。短期的なフォローアップ期間(介入直後から3か月まで)における効果について結論付けるには、得られたエビデンスは不十分なものであった。コンピューターによる指示は情報提供と併用すると、中期的に1日あたり平均14~96分座っている時間を減らす。これも、短期的な効果について結論を出すには至らなかった。

1つの試験では、「立つように」という指示の方が「歩くように」という指示に比べて、平均で1日あたり10~19分座っている時間を短縮した。

入手可能なエビデンスは、非常に細かく個別化した或いは詳細な情報を提供した場合、そこまで個別化していない或いは詳細ではない情報の提供と比べて、仕事中に座っている時間を減らすことに対する効果があるのかどうかについて結論付けるには不十分であった。また、得られたエビデンスからは、マインドフルネスのトレーニングや活動量計の使用が座って仕事をする時間に対する効果に関する結論を導くことはできなかった。

複数の介入を組み合わせた場合の効果

複数の介入を組み合わせた場合、座位で過ごす時間および長時間座り続ける仕事に費やした時間ともに、短期的および中期的に減らす効果があるようだ。しかし、このエビデンスはごく少数の試験によるもので、効果は試験ごとに非常に異なっていた。

結論

エビデンスの質は、ほとんどの介入について低度か非常に低度であった。主な原因は、試験のプロトコルの限界とサンプルサイズが小さいことによる。現時点ではエビデンスの質は低度だが、上下昇降デスクは、使用し始めた1年目に座位で仕事をする時間を減らす効果がある。しかしながら、その効果は時間とともに減少するようだ。他の介入においてこのような傾向があるのか、1 年以上の長期にわたって職場で座っている時間を減らす有効性について結論を下すには、全体的にエビデンスが不十分だった。職場で座位で過ごす時間を減らすことに対する、特に長期間にわたる効果について、様々な種類の介入の効果を評価するためには、さらに多くの試験が必要である。

訳注

《実施組織》杉山伸子 藤原崇志 翻訳[2018.7.8] 《注意》この日本語訳は、臨床医、疫学研究者などによる翻訳のチェックを受けて公開していますが、訳語の間違いなどお気づきの点がございましたら、コクランジャパンまでご連絡ください。なお、2013年6月からコクラン・ライブラリーのNew review, Updated reviewとも日単位で更新されています。最新版の日本語訳を掲載するよう努めておりますが、タイム・ラグが生じている場合もあります。ご利用に際しては、最新版(英語版)の内容をご確認ください。  《CD010912》

Ancillary