Get access

Cognitive-behavioural interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults

  • New
  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Pablo Luis Lopez,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Cognitive and Translational Neuroscience (INCyT), INECO Foundation, Favaloro University, Laboratory of Psychopathology Research, Buenos Aires, Capital Federal, Argentina
    • Pablo Luis Lopez, Laboratory of Psychopathology Research, Institute of Cognitive and Translational Neuroscience (INCyT), INECO Foundation, Favaloro University, Pacheco de Melo, 1854/60, Buenos Aires, Capital Federal, C1078AAI, Argentina. plopez1979@gmail.com. plopez@ineco.org.ar.

  • Fernando Manuel Torrente,

    1. Institute of Cognitive and Translational Neuroscience (INCyT), INECO Foundation, Favaloro University, Laboratory of Psychopathology Research, Buenos Aires, Capital Federal, Argentina
  • Agustín Ciapponi,

    1. Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS-CONICET), Argentine Cochrane Centre, Buenos Aires, Capital Federal, Argentina
  • Alicia Graciela Lischinsky,

    1. Institute of Cognitive and Translational Neuroscience (INCyT), INECO Foundation, Favaloro University, Laboratory of Psychopathology Research, Buenos Aires, Capital Federal, Argentina
  • Marcelo Cetkovich-Bakmas,

    1. Institute of Cognitive and Translational Neuroscience (INCyT), INECO Foundation, Favaloro University, Laboratory of Psychopathology Research, Buenos Aires, Capital Federal, Argentina
  • Juan Ignacio Rojas,

    1. Hospital Italiano Buenos Aires, Neurology Department, Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Marina Romano,

    1. Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS-CONICET), Argentine Cochrane Centre, Buenos Aires, Capital Federal, Argentina
  • Facundo F Manes

    1. Institute of Cognitive and Translational Neuroscience (INCyT), INECO Foundation, Favaloro University, Laboratory of Psychopathology Research, Buenos Aires, Capital Federal, Argentina

Abstract

Background

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental condition characterised by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, along with deficits in executive function, emotional regulation and motivation. The persistence of ADHD in adulthood is a serious clinical problem.

ADHD significantly affects social interactions, study and employment performance.

Previous studies suggest that cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) could be effective in treating adults with ADHD, especially when combined with pharmacological treatment. CBT aims to change the thoughts and behaviours that reinforce harmful effects of the disorder by teaching people techniques to control the core symptoms. CBT also aims to help people cope with emotions, such as anxiety and depression, and to improve self-esteem.

Objectives

To assess the effects of cognitive-behavioural-based therapy for ADHD in adults.

Search methods

In June 2017, we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, seven other databases and three trials registries. We also checked reference lists, handsearched congress abstracts, and contacted experts and researchers in the field.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating any form of CBT for adults with ADHD, either as a monotherapy or in conjunction with another treatment, versus one of the following: unspecific control conditions (comprising supportive psychotherapies, no treatment or waiting list) or other specific interventions.

Data collection and analysis

We used the standard methodological procedures suggested by Cochrane.

Main results

We included 14 RCTs (700 participants), 13 of which were conducted in the northern hemisphere and 1 in Australia.

Primary outcomes: ADHD symptoms

CBT versus unspecific control conditions (supportive psychotherapies, waiting list or no treatment)

- CBT versus supportive psychotherapies: CBT was more effective than supportive therapy for improving clinician-reported ADHD symptoms (1 study, 81 participants; low-quality evidence) but not for self-reported ADHD symptoms (SMD −0.16, 95% CI −0.52 to 0.19; 2 studies, 122 participants; low-quality evidence; small effect size).

- CBT versus waiting list: CBT led to a larger benefit in clinician-reported ADHD symptoms (SMD −1.22, 95% CI −2.03 to −0.41; 2 studies, 126 participants; very low-quality evidence; large effect size). We also found significant differences in favour of CBT for self-reported ADHD symptoms (SMD −0.84, 95% CI −1.18 to −0.50; 5 studies, 251 participants; moderate-quality evidence; large effect size).

CBT plus pharmacotherapy versus pharmacotherapy alone: CBT with pharmacotherapy was more effective than pharmacotherapy alone for clinician-reported core symptoms (SMD −0.80, 95% CI −1.31 to −0.30; 2 studies, 65 participants; very low-quality evidence; large effect size), self-reported core symptoms (MD −7.42 points, 95% CI −11.63 points to −3.22 points; 2 studies, 66 participants low-quality evidence) and self-reported inattention (1 study, 35 participants).

CBT versus other interventions that included therapeutic ingredients specifically targeted to ADHD: we found a significant difference in favour of CBT for clinician-reported ADHD symptoms (SMD −0.58, 95% CI −0.98 to −0.17; 2 studies, 97 participants; low-quality evidence; moderate effect size) and for self-reported ADHD symptom severity (SMD −0.44, 95% CI −0.88 to −0.01; 4 studies, 156 participants; low-quality evidence; small effect size).

Secondary outcomes

CBT versus unspecific control conditions: we found differences in favour of CBT compared with waiting-list control for self-reported depression (SMD −0.36, 95% CI −0.60 to −0.11; 5 studies, 258 participants; small effect size) and for self-reported anxiety (SMD −0.45, 95% CI −0.71 to −0.19; 4 studies, 239 participants; small effect size). We also observed differences in favour of CBT for self-reported state anger (1 study, 43 participants) and self-reported self-esteem (1 study 43 participants) compared to waiting list. We found no differences between CBT and supportive therapy (1 study, 81 participants) for self-rated depression, clinician-rated anxiety or self-rated self-esteem. Additionally, there were no differences between CBT and the waiting list for self-reported trait anger (1 study, 43 participants) or self-reported quality of life (SMD 0.21, 95% CI −0.29 to 0.71; 2 studies, 64 participants; small effect size).

CBT plus pharmacotherapy versus pharmacotherapy alone: we found differences in favour of CBT plus pharmacotherapy for the Clinical Global Impression score (MD −0.75 points, 95% CI −1.21 points to −0.30 points; 2 studies, 65 participants), self-reported depression (MD −6.09 points, 95% CI −9.55 points to −2.63 points; 2 studies, 66 participants) and self-reported anxiety (SMD −0.58, 95% CI −1.08 to −0.08; 2 studies, 66 participants; moderate effect size). We also observed differences favouring CBT plus pharmacotherapy (1 study, 31 participants) for clinician-reported depression and clinician-reported anxiety.

CBT versus other specific interventions: we found no differences for any of the secondary outcomes, such as self-reported depression and anxiety, and findings on self-reported quality of life varied across different studies.

Authors' conclusions

There is low-quality evidence that cognitive-behavioural-based treatments may be beneficial for treating adults with ADHD in the short term. Reductions in core symptoms of ADHD were fairly consistent across the different comparisons: in CBT plus pharmacotherapy versus pharmacotherapy alone and in CBT versus waiting list. There is low-quality evidence that CBT may also improve common secondary disturbances in adults with ADHD, such as depression and anxiety. However, the paucity of long-term follow-up data, the heterogeneous nature of the measured outcomes, and the limited geographical location (northern hemisphere and Australia) limit the generalisability of the results. None of the included studies reported severe adverse events, but five participants receiving different modalities of CBT described some type of adverse event, such as distress and anxiety.

Resumen

Intervenciones cognitivo-conductuales para el trastorno de déficit de atención e hiperactividad (TDAH) en adultos

Antecedentes

El trastorno de déficit de atención e hiperactividad (TDAH) es una afección del desarrollo caracterizada por síntomas de falta de atención, hiperactividad e impulsividad, junto con déficits en la función ejecutiva, la regulación emocional y la motivación. La persistencia del TDAH en la edad adulta es un problema clínico grave.

El TDAH afecta deforma significativa las interacciones sociales, el estudio y el rendimiento laboral.

Los estudios anteriores indican que la terapia cognitivo-conductual (TCC) podría ser efectiva para tratar a los adultos con TDAH, especialmente cuando se combina con tratamiento farmacológico. La TCC procura cambiar los pensamientos y los comportamientos que refuerzan los efectos perjudiciales del trastorno al enseñarles a los pacientes técnicas para controlar los síntomas centrales. La TCC también procura ayudar a los pacientes a enfrentar las emociones, como la ansiedad y la depresión y a mejorar la autoestima.

Objetivos

Evaluar los efectos de la terapia cognitivo-conductual para el TDAH en adultos.

Métodos de búsqueda

En junio 2017, se hicieron búsquedas en CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, en otras siete bases de datos y en tres registros de ensayos. También se verificaron las listas de referencias, los resúmenes de congresos obtenidos mediante búsquedas manuales y se contactó con expertos e investigadores de este tema.

Criterios de selección

Ensayos controlados aleatorios (ECA) que evalúan cualquier forma de TCC para adultos con TDAH, ya sea como monoterapia o junto con otro tratamiento, versus uno de los siguientes: condiciones de control no específicas (que comprenden psicoterapias de apoyo, ningún tratamiento o lista de espera) u otras intervenciones específicas.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Se utilizaron los procedimientos metodológicos estándar recomendados por la Colaboración Cochrane.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron 14 ECA (700 participantes), 13 de los cuales se realizaron en el hemisferio norte y uno en Australia.

Resultados primarios: Síntomas de TDAH

TCC versus condiciones de control no específicas (psicoterapias de apoyo, lista de espera o ningún tratamiento)

- TCC versus psicoterapias de apoyo: La TCC fue más efectiva que el tratamiento de apoyo para mejorar los síntomas de TDAH informados por el médico (1 estudio, 81 participantes; evidencia de baja calidad) pero no para los síntomas del TDAH autoinformados (DME -0,16; IC del 95% -0,52 a 0,19; dos estudios, 122 participantes; evidencia de baja calidad; tamaño pequeño del efecto).

- TCC versus lista de espera: La TCC dio lugar a un beneficio más grande en los síntomas del TDAH informados por el médico (DME -1,22; IC del 95% -2,03 a -0,41; dos estudios, 126 participantes; evidencia de muy baja calidad; tamaño grande del efecto). También se encontraron diferencias significativas a favor de la TCC para los síntomas del TDAH autoinformados (DME -0,84; IC del 95% -1,18 a -0,50; cinco estudios, 251 participantes; evidencia de calidad moderada; tamaño grande del efecto).

TCC más farmacoterapia versus farmacoterapia sola: La TCC con farmacoterapia fue más efectiva que la farmacoterapia sola para los síntomas centrales informados por el médico (DME -0,80; IC del 95% -1,31 a -0,30; dos estudios, 65 participantes; evidencia de muy baja calidad; tamaño grande del efecto), los síntomas centrales autoinformados (DM -7,42 puntos, IC del 95% -11,63 puntos a -3,22 puntos; 2 estudios, 66 participantes, evidencia de baja calidad) y la falta de atención autoinformada (un estudio, 35 participantes).

TCC versus otras intervenciones que incluyen componentes terapéuticos específicamente dirigidos al TDAH: Se encontró una diferencia significativa a favor de la TCC para los síntomas del TDAH informados por el médico (DME -0,58; IC del 95% -0,98 a -0,17; dos estudios, 97 participantes; evidencia de baja calidad; tamaño del efecto moderado) y para la gravedad de los síntomas del TDAH autoinformados (DME -0,44; IC del 95% -0,88 a -0,01; cuatro estudios, 156 participantes; evidencia de baja calidad; tamaño pequeño del efecto).

Resultados secundarios

TCC versus condiciones de control no específicas: se encontraron diferencias a favor de la TCC comparada con el control en lista de espera para la depresión autoinformada (DME -0,36; IC del 95% -0,60 a -0,11; cinco estudios, 258 participantes; tamaño pequeño del efecto) y para la ansiedad autoinformada (DME -0,45; IC del 95% -0,71 a -0,19; cuatro estudios, 239 participantes; tamaño pequeño del efecto). También se observaron diferencias a favor de la TCC para el estado de ira autoinformado (1 estudio, 43 participantes) y la autoestima autoinformada (1 estudio, 43 participantes) en comparación con la lista de espera. No se encontró ninguna diferencia entre la TCC y el tratamiento de apoyo (1 estudio, 81 participantes) para la depresión autocalificada, la ansiedad calificada por el médico o la autoestima autocalificada. Además, no hubo diferencias entre la TCC y la lista de espera para el rasgo de ira autoinformado (1 estudio, 43 participantes) o la calidad de vida autoinformada (DME 0,21; IC del 95% -0,29 a 0,71; dos estudios, 64 participantes; tamaño pequeño del efecto).

TCC más farmacoterapia versus farmacoterapia sola: Se encontraron diferencias a favor de la TCC más farmacoterapia para la puntuación de la Clinical Global Impression (DM -0,75 puntos, IC del 95% -1,21 puntos a -0,30 puntos; 2 estudios, 65 participantes), la depresión autoinformada (DM -6,09 puntos, IC del 95% -9,55 puntos a -2,63 puntos; 2 estudios, 66 participantes) y la ansiedad autoinformada (DME -0,58; IC del 95% -1,08 a -0,08; dos estudios, 66 participantes; tamaño moderado del efecto). También se observaron diferencias a favor de la TCC más farmacoterapia (1 estudio, 31 participantes) para la depresión informada por el médico y la ansiedad informada por el médico.

TCC versus otras intervenciones específicas: No se encontraron diferencias para ninguno de los resultados secundarios, como la depresión autoinformada y la ansiedad, y los resultados en la calidad de vida autoinformada variaron a través de diferentes estudios.

Conclusiones de los autores

Hay evidencia de baja calidad de que la terapia cognitivo-conductual puede ser beneficiosa para el tratamiento de los adultos con TDAH a corto plazo. Las reducciones en los síntomas centrales de TDAH fueron bastante consistentes a través de las diferentes comparaciones: en la TCC más farmacoterapia versus farmacoterapia sola y en la TCC versus lista de espera. Hay evidencia de baja calidad de que la TCC también puede mejorar los trastornos secundarios comunes en los adultos con TDAH, como la depresión y la ansiedad. Sin embargo, la escasez de datos de seguimiento a largo plazo, la naturaleza heterogénea de los resultados medidos y la ubicación geográfica limitada (hemisferio norte y Australia) limitan la generalizabilidad de los resultados. Ninguno de los estudios incluidos informó los eventos adversos graves, aunque cinco participantes que recibieron diferentes modalidades de TCC describieron algún tipo de evento adverso, como dificultad y ansiedad.

Plain language summary

Cognitive-behavioural therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults

Background

People with ADHD have difficulty paying attention, concentrating, dealing with hyperactivity (e.g. waiting in queues) and acting without thinking (i.e. impulsivity). In adults, ADHD significantly affects social interactions, study and employment performance.

Previous studies suggest that cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) could be effective for treating adults with ADHD, especially when combined with pharmacological (i.e. drug) treatment. CBT aims to change the thoughts and behaviours that reinforce the harmful effects of the disorder by teaching people techniques to control the core symptoms. CBT also aims to help people cope with emotions, such as anxiety and depression, and to improve self-esteem.

Review question

Does CBT, alone or in combination with pharmacological treatment, reduce the core symptoms of ADHD in adults more than other treatments or no specific treatment?

Search dates

The evidence is current to June 2017.

Study characteristics

We found 14 randomised controlled trials (studies in which participants are randomly assigned to different treatment groups) that described the effects of CBT in 700 adults with ADHD, aged between 18 and 65 years. Thirteen trials took place in the northern hemisphere and one in Australia.

Of the included studies, three compared CBT versus other specific interventions and seven versus unspecific control conditions (unspecific supportive therapy, waiting list or no treatment). Additionally, two compared CBT plus pharmacotherapy versus pharmacotherapy alone. One trial compared CBT to two control groups, one of which was given other specific non-pharmacological treatment and one of which was a no-treatment control.

Quality of the evidence

Because of imprecision (i.e. inaccurate results), inconsistency (i.e. results differ across trials) and methodological limitations, we considered the quality of the evidence of the included studies to range from very low to moderate.

Key results

The findings suggest that CBT might improve the core symptoms of ADHD, reducing inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity.

When combined with pharmacotherapy, there was evidence of an improvement in global functioning (i.e. a person's overall level of functioning in life) and a reduction in depression and anxiety compared to that seen with pharmacotherapy alone.

None of the included studies reported severe adverse events. However, five participants described some type of adverse event, such as distress and anxiety.

Resumen en términos sencillos

Terapia cognitivo-conductual para el trastorno de déficit de atención e hiperactividad (TDAH) en adultos

Antecedentes

Los pacientes con TDAH tienen dificultad para prestar atención, concentrarse, manejar la hiperactividad (p.ej. esperar en las filas) y actuar sin pensar (es decir impulsividad). En los adultos, el TDAH afecta de forma significativa las interacciones sociales, el estudio y el rendimiento laboral.

Los estudios anteriores indican que la terapia cognitivo-conductual (TCC) podría ser efectiva para el tratamiento en los adultos con TDAH, especialmente cuando se combina con tratamiento farmacológico (es decir fármacos). La TCC procura cambiar los pensamientos y los comportamientos que refuerzan los efectos perjudiciales del trastorno al enseñarles a los pacientes técnicas para controlar los síntomas centrales. La TCC también procura ayudar a los pacientes a enfrentar las emociones, como la ansiedad y la depresión y a mejorar la autoestima.

Pregunta de la revisión

¿La TCC, sola o en combinación con tratamiento farmacológico, reduce los síntomas centrales del TDAH en adultos más que otros tratamientos o ningún tratamiento específico?

Fechas de la búsqueda

La evidencia está actualizada hasta junio de 2017.

Características de los estudios

Se encontraron 14 ensayos controlados aleatorios (estudios en los que los participantes son asignados al azar a diferentes grupos de tratamiento) que describieron los efectos de la TCC en 700 adultos con TDAH, de entre 18 y 65 años de edad. Trece ensayos se llevaron a cabo en el hemisferio norte y uno en Australia.

De los estudios incluidos, tres compararon TCC versus otras intervenciones específicas y siete versus condiciones de control no específicas (tratamiento de apoyo no específico, lista de espera o ningún tratamiento). Además, dos compararon TCC más farmacoterapia versus farmacoterapia sola. Un ensayo comparó TCC versus dos grupos de control, uno de los cuales recibió otro tratamiento específico no farmacológico y uno de los cuales fue un control de ningún tratamiento.

Calidad de la evidencia

Debido a la imprecisión (es decir resultados inexactos), la inconsistencia (es decir los resultados difieren a través de los ensayos) y las limitaciones metodológicas, se consideró que la calidad de la evidencia de los estudios incluidos varió de muy baja a moderada.

Resultados clave

Los hallazgos indican que la TCC podría mejorar los síntomas centrales del TDAH, y reducir la falta de atención, la hiperactividad y la impulsividad.

Cuando se combina con farmacoterapia, hubo evidencia de una mejoría en el funcionamiento global (es decir un nivel general de funcionamiento del paciente en la vida) y una reducción en la depresión y la ansiedad en comparación con lo observado con la farmacoterapia sola.

Ninguno de los estudios incluidos informó eventos adversos graves. Sin embargo, cinco participantes describieron algún tipo de evento adverso, como dificultad y ansiedad.

Notas de traducción

La traducción y edición de las revisiones Cochrane han sido realizadas bajo la responsabilidad del Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano, gracias a la suscripción efectuada por el Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad del Gobierno español. Si detecta algún problema con la traducción, por favor, contacte con Infoglobal Suport, cochrane@infoglobal-suport.com.