Optical correction of refractive error for preventing and treating eye symptoms in computer users

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Pauline Heus,

    Corresponding author
    1. Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Cochrane Netherlands, Utrecht, Netherlands
    • Pauline Heus, Cochrane Netherlands, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Room Str. 6.131, PO Box 85500, Utrecht, 3508 GA, Netherlands. p.heus@umcutrecht.nl.

  • Jos H Verbeek,

    1. Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Cochrane Work Review Group, TYÖTERVEYSLAITOS, Finland
  • Christina Tikka

    1. Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Cochrane Work Review Group, TYÖTERVEYSLAITOS, Finland

Abstract

Background

Computer users frequently complain about problems with seeing and functioning of the eyes. Asthenopia is a term generally used to describe symptoms related to (prolonged) use of the eyes like ocular fatigue, headache, pain or aching around the eyes, and burning and itchiness of the eyelids. The prevalence of asthenopia during or after work on a computer ranges from 46.3% to 68.5%. Uncorrected or under-corrected refractive error can contribute to the development of asthenopia. A refractive error is an error in the focusing of light by the eye and can lead to reduced visual acuity. There are various possibilities for optical correction of refractive errors including eyeglasses, contact lenses and refractive surgery.

Objectives

To examine the evidence on the effectiveness, safety and applicability of optical correction of refractive error for reducing and preventing eye symptoms in computer users.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; Embase; Web of Science; and OSH update, all to 20 December 2017. Additionally, we searched trial registries and checked references of included studies.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials of interventions evaluating optical correction for computer workers with refractive error for preventing or treating asthenopia and their effect on health related quality of life.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed study eligibility and risk of bias, and extracted data. Where appropriate, we combined studies in a meta-analysis.

Main results

We included eight studies with 381 participants. Three were parallel group RCTs, three were cross-over RCTs and two were quasi-randomised cross-over trials. All studies evaluated eyeglasses, there were no studies that evaluated contact lenses or surgery. Seven studies evaluated computer glasses with at least one focal area for the distance of the computer screen with or without additional focal areas in presbyopic persons. Six studies compared computer glasses to other types of glasses; and one study compared them to an ergonomic workplace assessment. The eighth study compared optimal correction of refractive error with the actual spectacle correction in use. Two studies evaluated computer glasses in persons with asthenopia but for the others the glasses were offered to all workers regardless of symptoms. The risk of bias was unclear in five, high in two and low in one study. Asthenopia was measured as eyestrain or a summary score of symptoms but there were no studies on health-related quality of life. Adverse events were measured as headache, nausea or dizziness. Median asthenopia scores at baseline were about 30% of the maximum possible score.

Progressive computer glasses versus monofocal glasses
One study found no considerable difference in asthenopia between various progressive computer glasses and monofocal computer glasses after one-year follow-up (mean difference (MD) change scores 0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) −5.0 to 5.4 on a 100 mm VAS scale, low quality evidence). For headache the results were in favour of progressive glasses.

Progressive computer glasses with an intermediate focus in the upper part of the glasses versus other glasses
In two studies progressive computer glasses with intermediate focus led to a small decrease in asthenopia symptoms (SMD −0.49, 95% CI −0.75 to −0.23, low-quality evidence) but not in headache score in the short-term compared to general purpose progressive glasses. There were similar small decreases in dizziness. At medium term follow-up, in one study the effect size was not statistically significant (SMD −0.64, 95% CI −1.40 to 0.12). The study did not assess adverse events.

Another study found no considerable difference in asthenopia between progressive computer glasses and monofocal computer glasses after one-year follow-up (MD change scores 1.44, 95% CI −6.95 to 9.83 on a 100 mm VAS scale, very low quality evidence). For headache the results were inconsistent.

Progressive computer glasses with far-distance focus in the upper part of the glasses versus other glasses
One study found no considerable difference in number of persons with asthenopia between progressive computer glasses with far-distance focus and bifocal computer glasses after four weeks' follow-up (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.40 to 2.50, very low quality evidence). The number of persons with headache, nausea and dizziness was also not different between groups.

Another study found no considerable difference in asthenopia between progressive computer glasses with far-distance focus and monofocal computer glasses after one-year follow-up (MD change scores −1.79, 95% CI −11.60 to 8.02 on a 100 mm VAS scale, very low quality evidence). The effects on headaches were inconsistent.

One study found no difference between progressive far-distance focus computer glasses and trifocal glasses in effect on eyestrain severity (MD −0.50, 95% CI −1.07 to 0.07, very low quality evidence) or on eyestrain frequency (MD −0.75, 95% CI −1.61 to 0.11, very low quality evidence).

Progressive computer glasses versus ergonomic assessment with habitual (computer) glasses
One study found that computer glasses optimised for individual needs reduced asthenopia sum score more than an ergonomic assessment and habitual (computer) glasses (MD −8.9, 95% CI −16.47 to −1.33, scale 0 to 140, very low quality evidence) but there was no effect on the frequency of eyestrain (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.38 to 3.11, very low quality evidence).

We rated the quality of the evidence as low or very low due to risk of bias in the included studies, inconsistency in the results and imprecision.

Authors' conclusions

There is low to very low quality evidence that providing computer users with progressive computer glasses does not lead to a considerable decrease in problems with the eyes or headaches compared to other computer glasses. Progressive computer glasses might be slightly better than progressive glasses for daily use in the short term but not in the intermediate term and there is no data on long-term follow-up. The quality of the evidence is low or very low and therefore we are uncertain about this conclusion. Larger studies with several hundreds of participants are needed with proper randomisation, validated outcome measurement methods, and longer follow-up of at least one year to improve the quality of the evidence.

Resumen

Corrección óptica del error refractivo para la prevención y el tratamiento de los síntomas oculares en los usuarios de computadoras

Antecedentes

Los usuarios de computadoras con frecuencia se quejan acerca de los problemas con la visión y el funcionamiento de los ojos. La astenopía es un término usado en general para describir los síntomas relacionados con el uso (prolongado) de los ojos como la fatiga ocular, la cefalea, el dolor o malestar alrededor de los ojos y el ardor y la picazón en los párpados. La prevalencia de la astenopía durante o después de trabajar con una computadora varía de un 46,3% a un 68,5%. El error refractivo no corregido o corregido de forma deficiente puede contribuir al desarrollo de astenopía. Un error refractivo es un error en el enfoque de la luz por parte del ojo y puede dar lugar a una agudeza visual reducida. Hay diversas posibilidades para la corrección óptica de los errores refractivos incluidos los anteojos, los lentes de contacto y la cirugía refractiva.

Objetivos

Examinar la evidencia sobre la efectividad, la seguridad y la aplicabilidad de la corrección óptica del error refractivo para reducir y prevenir los síntomas oculares en los usuarios de computadoras.

Métodos de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en el Registro Cochrane Central de Ensayos Controlados (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials - CENTRAL); PubMed; Embase; Web of Science; y en OSH update, en todas hasta el 20 diciembre 2017. Además, se realizaron búsquedas en los registros de ensayos y se verificaron las referencias de los estudios incluidos.

Criterios de selección

Se incluyeron ensayos controlados aleatorios (ECA) y ensayos cuasialeatorios de las intervenciones que evaluaron la corrección óptica para los trabajadores que utilizan computadoras y presentan errores refractivos con objeto de prevenir o tratar la astenopía y su efecto sobre la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos autores de la revisión, de forma independiente, evaluaron la elegibilidad y el riesgo de sesgo de los estudios y extrajeron los datos. Cuando fue apropiado, se combinaron los estudios en un metanálisis.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron ocho estudios con 381 participantes. Tres fueron ECA de grupos paralelos, tres fueron ECA cruzados y dos fueron ensayos cruzados cuasialeatorios. Todos los estudios evaluaron los anteojos, no hubo ningún estudio que evaluara los lentes de contacto ni la cirugía. Siete estudios evaluaron los anteojos para computadora con al menos una área focal para la distancia de la pantalla de la computadora con o sin áreas focales adicionales en pacientes presbiópicos. Seis estudios compararon los anteojos para computadora con otros tipos de lentes; y un estudio los comparó con una evaluación ergonómica del lugar de trabajo. El octavo estudio comparó la corrección óptima del error refractivo con la corrección real de las gafas en uso. Dos estudios evaluaron los anteojos para computadora en pacientes con astenopía aunque para los otros, los lentes se ofrecieron a todos los trabajadores de forma independiente de los síntomas. El riesgo de sesgo era incierto en cinco estudios, alto en dos y bajo en uno. La astenopía se midió como cansancio en la vista o una puntuación resumida de los síntomas aunque no hubo ningún estudio sobre la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud. Los eventos adversos se midieron como cefalea, náuseas o mareos. Las medianas de puntuación de la astenopía al inicio fueron de alrededor del 30% de la puntuación máxima posible.

Anteojos para computadora progresivos versus anteojos monofocales
Un estudio no encontró diferencias considerables en la astenopía entre diversos anteojos para computadora progresivos y anteojos para computadora monofocales después de un año de seguimiento (diferencia de medias [DM] en las puntuaciones del cambio 0,23; intervalo de confianza [IC] del 95%: -5,0 a 5,4 en una EAV de 100 mm, evidencia de baja calidad). Para la cefalea los resultados estuvieron a favor de los anteojos progresivos.

Anteojos para computadora progresivos con enfoque intermedio en la parte superior de los lentes versus otros anteojos
En dos estudios los anteojos para computadora progresivos con enfoque intermedio dieron lugar a una disminución pequeña en los síntomas de astenopía (DME -0,49; IC del 95%: -0,75 a -0,23; evidencia de baja calidad) pero no en la puntuación de la cefalea a corto plazo en comparación con los anteojos progresivos de uso general. Hubo disminuciones pequeñas similares en los mareos. Al momento del seguimiento a plazo medio, en un estudio el tamaño del efecto no fue estadísticamente significativo (DME -0,64; IC del 95%: -1,40 a 0,12). El estudio no evaluó los eventos adversos.

Otro estudio no encontró diferencias considerables en la astenopía entre los anteojos para computadora progresivos y los anteojos para computadora monofocales después de un año de seguimiento (DM en las puntuaciones del cambio 1,44; IC del 95%: -6,95 a 9,83 en una EAV de 100 mm, evidencia de muy baja calidad). Para la cefalea los resultados fueron inconsistentes.

Anteojos para computadora progresivos con enfoque a gran distancia en la parte superior de los lentes versus otros anteojos
Un estudio no encontró diferencias considerables en el número de personas con astenopía entre los anteojos para computadora progresivos con enfoque a gran distancia y los anteojos para computadora bifocales después de cuatro semanas de seguimiento (OR 1,00; IC del 95%: 0,40 a 2,50; evidencia de calidad muy baja). El número de pacientes con cefalea, náuseas y mareos tampoco fue diferente entre los grupos.

Otro estudio no encontró diferencias considerables en la astenopía entre los anteojos para computadora progresivos con enfoque a gran distancia y los anteojos para computadora monofocales después de un año de seguimiento (DM de las puntuaciones del cambio -1,79; IC del 95%: -11,60 a 8,02 en una EAV de 100 mm, evidencia de calidad muy baja). Los efectos sobre las cefaleas fueron inconsistentes.

Un estudio no encontró diferencias entre los anteojos para computadora progresivos con enfoque a gran distancia y los anteojos trifocales en cuanto al efecto sobre la gravedad del cansancio en la vista (DM -0,50; IC del 95%: -1,07 a 0,07; evidencia de muy baja calidad) ni en la frecuencia del cansancio en la vista (DM -0,75; IC del 95%: -1,61 a 0,11; evidencia de calidad muy baja).

Anteojos para computadora progresivos versus evaluación ergonómica con anteojos habituales (para computadora)
Un estudio halló que los anteojos para computadora optimizados para las necesidades individuales redujeron la puntuación acumulada de la astenopía más que una evaluación ergonómica y los anteojos habituales (para computadora) (DM -8,9; IC del 95%: -16,47 a -1,33; escala 0 a 140; evidencia de muy baja calidad) aunque no hubo ningún efecto sobre la frecuencia del cansancio en la vista (OR 1,08; IC del 95%: 0,38 a 3,11; evidencia de calidad muy baja).

La calidad de la evidencia se consideró baja o muy baja debido al riesgo de sesgo en los estudios incluidos, la inconsistencia en los resultados y la imprecisión.

Conclusiones de los autores

Hay evidencia de calidad baja a muy baja de que la provisión de anteojos para computadora progresivos a los usuarios de computadoras no da lugar a una considerable disminución en los problemas oculares o las cefaleas en comparación con otros anteojos para computadora. Los anteojos progresivos para computadora quizá sean levemente mejores que los anteojos progresivos para uso diario a corto plazo pero no a plazo intermedio y no hay datos sobre el seguimiento a largo plazo. La calidad de la evidencia es baja o muy baja y, por lo tanto, no existe seguridad acerca de esta conclusión. Se necesitan estudios más amplios con varios cientos de participantes, con una asignación al azar adecuada, métodos de medición de resultado validados y un seguimiento más largo de al menos un año para mejorar la calidad de la evidencia.

Plain language summary

Eyeglasses, contact lenses or eye surgery for preventing and treating eye symptoms in computer users

What is the aim of this review?

Computer users frequently complain about problems with their eyes, or headaches. Eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery of the eye might help to decrease or prevent these symptoms. We examined the effects of these interventions on eye symptoms and quality of life.

Key messages

Computer glasses with specific types of lenses are no different to other types of computer glasses in terms of eye symptoms. Computer glasses might improve eye symptoms more than glasses designed for daily use in the short term but not at six months follow-up and there is no evidence on long-term follow-up. Due to the very low quality of the evidence we are uncertain about this conclusion. There are no studies on contact lenses or eye surgery to decrease eye symptoms of computer users. Randomised studies are needed with hundreds of participants that better measure symptoms at one-year follow-up.

What was studied in the review?

We found eight studies with 381 participants. All studies evaluated eyeglasses. We found no studies evaluating contact lenses or surgery. Two studies looked at progressive computer glasses where the focus gradually changes from nearby to the distance of the computer screen but one did not report any data. Two studies examined progressive computer glasses in which the focus also extended a couple of meters beyond the computer screen. Five studies looked at progressive computer glasses whose focus gradually changed to far distance. One study examined if the spectacles that participants already had could be improved and whether that influenced their computer vision, but the study did not provide data. We judged the risk of bias to be unclear in four studies, high in two and low in another study.

What are the main results of the review?

Progressive computer glasses compared to other types of computer glasses
One study found no difference in eye symptoms after one year between progressive computer glasses and computer glasses with only one focus.

Progressive computer glasses including middle distance focus in the upper part of the glasses compared to other types of glasses
Two studies found a small difference in eye symptoms between progressive computer glasses including middle distance focus and progressive glasses for everyday use when the glasses had been used for a period of one week to one month. There was no difference in dizziness between the two kinds of glasses. Another study found no difference in eye symptoms after one year between progressive computer glasses and computer glasses with only one focus.

Progressive computer glasses including far-away focus in the upper part of the glasses compared to other types of glasses
Two different studies found no difference in eye symptoms after one month between computer glasses including a far-away focus and bifocal or trifocal computer glasses. Another study found that after one year glasses with only one focus were just as good as computer glasses. One study compared progressive computer glasses to an assessment of the participant's computer work station and own (computer) glasses and found an improvement of asthenopia symptom-score of about 40%.

How up-to-date is this review?

We searched for studies that had been published up to 20 December, 2017.

Resumen en términos sencillos

Anteojos, lentes de contacto o cirugía ocular para la prevención y el tratamiento de los síntomas oculares en usuarios de computadoras

¿Cuál es el objetivo de esta revisión?

Los usuarios de computadoras con frecuencia se quejan de problemas oculares, o cefaleas. Los anteojos, los lentes de contacto o la cirugía ocular podrían ayudar a reducir o prevenir estos síntomas. Se examinaron los efectos de estas intervenciones sobre los síntomas oculares y la calidad de vida.

Mensajes clave

Los anteojos para computadora con tipos específicos de lentes no son diferentes de otros tipos de anteojos para computadora en cuanto a los síntomas oculares. Los anteojos para computadora podrían mejorar los síntomas oculares más que los anteojos diseñados para el uso diario a corto plazo pero no a los seis meses de seguimiento y no hay evidencia sobre el seguimiento a largo plazo. Debido a la calidad muy baja de la evidencia no existe seguridad acerca de esta conclusión. No hay ningún estudio sobre los lentes de contacto o la cirugía ocular para reducir los síntomas oculares en usuarios de computadoras. Se necesitan estudios aleatorios con cientos de participantes que midan mejor los síntomas al año de seguimiento.

¿Qué se estudió en la revisión?

Se encontraron ocho estudios con 381 participantes. Todos los estudios evaluaron los anteojos. No se encontraron estudios que evaluaran los lentes de contacto ni la intervención quirúrgica. Dos estudios consideraron los anteojos para computadora progresivos en los que el enfoque cambia gradualmente de una distancia cercana hasta la distancia de la pantalla de la computadora aunque uno no informó datos. Dos estudios examinaron los anteojos para computadora progresivos en que el enfoque también se extendió a un par de metros más allá de la pantalla de la computadora. Cinco estudios consideraron los anteojos para computadora progresivos cuyo enfoque cambiaba gradualmente a una distancia lejana. Un estudio examinó si las gafas que los participantes ya tenían podían mejorarse y si dicho procedimiento influía en la visión de la computadora, aunque el estudio no proporcionó datos. El riesgo de sesgo se consideró poco claro en cuatro estudios, alto en dos y bajo en otro estudio.

¿Cuáles son los principales resultados de la revisión?

Anteojos para computadora progresivos comparados con otros tipos de anteojos para computadora
Un estudio no encontró diferencias en los síntomas oculares después de un año entre los anteojos para computadora progresivos y los anteojos para computadora con sólo un enfoque.

Anteojos para computadora progresivos con enfoque de media distancia en la parte superior de los lentes comparados con otros tipos de lentes
Dos estudios encontraron una diferencia pequeña en los síntomas oculares entre los anteojos para computadora progresivos que incluían un enfoque a media distancia y los anteojos progresivos para uso diario cuando los anteojos se habían usado durante un período de una semana a un mes. No hubo diferencias en los mareos entre las dos clases de lentes. Otro estudio no encontró diferencias en los síntomas oculares después de un año entre los anteojos para computadora progresivos y los anteojos para computadora con sólo un enfoque.

Anteojos para computadora progresivos con enfoque a una distancia muy lejana en la parte superior de los lentes en comparación con otros tipos de anteojos
Dos estudios diferentes no encontraron diferencias en los síntomas oculares después de un mes entre los anteojos para computadora con enfoque a una distancia muy lejana y los anteojos para computadora bifocales o trifocales. Otro estudio halló que después de un año, los anteojos con sólo un enfoque presentaron la misma efectividad que los anteojos para computadora. Un estudio comparó los anteojos para computadora progresivos con una evaluación de la estación de trabajo donde se encuentra la computadora del participante y sus propios lentes (para computadora) y encontró una mejoría en la puntuación de los síntomas de astenopía de alrededor del 40%.

¿Cuál es el grado de actualización de esta revisión?

Se hicieron búsquedas de estudios que se habían publicado hasta el 20 diciembre 2017.

Notas de traducción

La traducción y edición de las revisiones Cochrane han sido realizadas bajo la responsabilidad del Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano, gracias a la suscripción efectuada por el Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad del Gobierno español. Si detecta algún problema con la traducción, por favor, contacte con Infoglobal Suport, cochrane@infoglobal-suport.com.