Get access

Risk-reducing mastectomy for the prevention of primary breast cancer

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors


Abstract

Background

Recent progress in understanding the genetic basis of breast cancer and widely publicized reports of celebrities undergoing risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) have increased interest in RRM as a method of preventing breast cancer. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2004 and previously updated in 2006 and 2010.

Objectives

(i) To determine whether risk-reducing mastectomy reduces death rates from any cause in women who have never had breast cancer and in women who have a history of breast cancer in one breast, and (ii) to examine the effect of risk-reducing mastectomy on other endpoints, including breast cancer incidence, breast cancer mortality, disease-free survival, physical morbidity, and psychosocial outcomes.

Search methods

For this Review update, we searched Cochrane Breast Cancer's Specialized Register, MEDLINE, Embase and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 9 July 2016. We included studies in English.

Selection criteria

Participants included women at risk for breast cancer in at least one breast. Interventions included all types of mastectomy performed for the purpose of preventing breast cancer.

Data collection and analysis

At least two review authors independently abstracted data from each report. We summarized data descriptively; quantitative meta-analysis was not feasible due to heterogeneity of study designs and insufficient reporting. We analyzed data separately for bilateral risk-reducing mastectomy (BRRM) and contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM). Four review authors assessed the methodological quality to determine whether or not the methods used sufficiently minimized selection bias, performance bias, detection bias, and attrition bias.

Main results

All 61 included studies were observational studies with some methodological limitations; randomized trials were absent. The studies presented data on 15,077 women with a wide range of risk factors for breast cancer, who underwent RRM.

Twenty-one BRRM studies looking at the incidence of breast cancer or disease-specific mortality, or both, reported reductions after BRRM, particularly for those women with BRCA1/2 mutations. Twenty-six CRRM studies consistently reported reductions in incidence of contralateral breast cancer but were inconsistent about improvements in disease-specific survival. Seven studies attempted to control for multiple differences between intervention groups and showed no overall survival advantage for CRRM. Another study showed significantly improved survival following CRRM, but after adjusting for bilateral risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (BRRSO), the CRRM effect on all-cause mortality was no longer significant.

Twenty studies assessed psychosocial measures; most reported high levels of satisfaction with the decision to have RRM but greater variation in satisfaction with cosmetic results. Worry over breast cancer was significantly reduced after BRRM when compared both to baseline worry levels and to the groups who opted for surveillance rather than BRRM, but there was diminished satisfaction with body image and sexual feelings.

Seventeen case series reporting on adverse events from RRM with or without reconstruction reported rates of unanticipated reoperations from 4% in those without reconstruction to 64% in participants with reconstruction.

In women who have had cancer in one breast, removing the other breast may reduce the incidence of cancer in that other breast, but there is insufficient evidence that this improves survival because of the continuing risk of recurrence or metastases from the original cancer. Additionally, thought should be given to other options to reduce breast cancer risk, such as BRRSO and chemoprevention, when considering RRM.

Authors' conclusions

While published observational studies demonstrated that BRRM was effective in reducing both the incidence of, and death from, breast cancer, more rigorous prospective studies are suggested. BRRM should be considered only among those at high risk of disease, for example, BRCA1/2 carriers. CRRM was shown to reduce the incidence of contralateral breast cancer, but there is insufficient evidence that CRRM improves survival, and studies that control for multiple confounding variables are recommended. It is possible that selection bias in terms of healthier, younger women being recommended for or choosing CRRM produces better overall survival numbers for CRRM. Given the number of women who may be over-treated with BRRM/CRRM, it is critical that women and clinicians understand the true risk for each individual woman before considering surgery. Additionally, thought should be given to other options to reduce breast cancer risk, such as BRRSO and chemoprevention when considering RRM.

Plain language summary

Women should be aware of their true risk of developing breast cancer and the limitations of current evidence when considering risk-reducing mastectomy

Review question

We reviewed the evidence on whether risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) reduces death rates from any cause in women who have never had breast cancer and in women who have a history of breast cancer in one breast. Also, we reviewed the effect of RRM on other endpoints, including breast cancer incidence, breast cancer mortality, disease-free survival, physical morbidity, and psychosocial outcomes.

Background

Recent progress in understanding the genetic basis of breast cancer and widely publicized reports of celebrities undergoing RRM have increased interest in it as a method of preventing breast cancer.

Study characteristics

Sixty-one studies presented data on 15,077 women with a wide range of risk factors for developing breast cancer, who underwent RRM. Risk-reducing mastectomy could include either surgically removing both breasts to prevent breast cancer (bilateral risk-reducing mastectomy or BRRM), or removing the disease-free breast in women who have had breast cancer in one breast to reduce the incidence of breast cancer in the other breast (contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy or CRRM). The evidence is current to July 2016.

Key results

The BRRM studies reported that it reduced the incidence of breast cancer or the number of deaths or both, but many of the studies have methodological limitations. After BRRM, most women are satisfied with their decision, but reported less satisfaction with cosmetic results, body image, and sexual feelings. One of the complications of RRM was the need for additional unanticipated surgeries, particularly in women undergoing reconstruction after RRM. However, most women also experienced reduced worry of developing and dying from breast cancer along with diminished satisfaction with body image and sexual feelings

In women who have had cancer in one breast, removing the other breast (CRRM) may reduce the incidence of cancer in that other breast, but there is insufficient evidence that this improves survival because of the continuing risk of recurrence or metastases from the original cancer.

While published observational studies demonstrated that BRRM was effective in reducing both the incidence of, and death from, breast cancer, more rigorous prospective studies are suggested. BRRM should be considered only among those at high risk of disease, for example, carriers of mutations in the breast cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. CRRM was shown to reduce the incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CBC), but there is insufficient evidence that CRRM improves survival, and studies that control for multiple variables that can affect results are recommended. It is possible that selection bias in terms of healthier, younger women being recommended for or choosing CRRM produces better overall survival numbers for CRRM.

Quality of evidence

Just over half of the studies were found to have a low risk of selection bias, that is, studies adjusting for systematic differences in prognosis or treatment responsiveness between the groups, and similarly, 60% had a low risk of detection bias, that is, studies considered systematic differences in the ways the outcomes were measured and detected. The primary cause for both selection bias and detection bias was not controlling for all major confounding factors, e.g., risk factors or having bilateral risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (BRRSO - surgery to remove fallopian tubes and ovaries) in the subject and control groups. Performance bias (validation of the risk-reducing mastectomy) was not problematic, as most studies were based on surgical reports; three relied on self-reports and eight were unclear because of multiple sources of data and/or broad timeframe. Attrition bias was at high risk or unclear in approximately 13% of the studies. The mean or median follow-up period reported was from 1 - 22 years.

Conclusions

Given the number of women who may be over-treated with BRRM/CRRM, it is critical that women and clinicians understand the true risk for each individual woman before considering surgery. Additionally, thought should be given to other options to reduce breast cancer risk, such as BRRSO and chemoprevention, when considering RRM.

Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Wenn eine risikomindernde Mastektomie in Betracht gezogen wird, sollten Frauen sich ihres persönlichen Risikos, an Brustkrebs zu erkranken, bewusst sein, ebenso wie den Grenzen der derzeitigen Evidenz

Fragestellung

Wir haben die Evidenz dazu überprüft, ob risikomindernde Mastektomie (prophylaktische Mastektomie) die Sterblichkeit aufgrund von jeglicher Ursache bei Frauen, die nie Brustkrebs hatten und Frauen, die eine Vorgeschichte von Brustkrebs in einer Brust aufweisen, reduziert. Ebenso haben wir die Wirkung von risikomindernder Mastektomie auf andere Endpunkte, einschließlich der Brustkrebsinzidenz, der Brustkrebsmortalität, dem krankheitsfreien Überleben, der physischen Morbidität und psychosozialer Endpunkte überprüft.

Hintergrund

Neuere Fortschritte im Verständnis der genetischen Grundlagen von Brustkrebs und viel beachtete Berichte von Prominenten, die sich einer risikomindernden Mastektomie unterzogen haben, haben das Interesse daran als Methode zur Prävention von Brustkrebs erhöht.

Studienmerkmale

Einundsechzig Studien enthielten Daten von 15.077 Frauen mit einer großen Breite an Risikofaktoren für die Entwicklung von Brustkrebs, die sich einer risikomindernden Mastektomie unterzogen haben. Eine risikomindernde Mastektomie kann entweder bedeuten, beide Brüste zur Prävention von Brustkrebs chirurgisch zu entfernen (bilaterale risikomindernde Mastektomie) oder die krankheitsfreie Brust bei Frauen zu entfernen, die in einer Brust Brustkrebs gehabt haben, um die Inzidenz von Brustkrebs in der anderen Brust zu reduzieren (kontralaterale risikomindernde Mastektomie). Die Evidenz ist auf dem Stand von Juli 2016.

Hauptergebnisse

Die Studien zur bilateralen risikomindernden Mastektomie berichteten, dass sie die Inzidenz von Brustkrebs oder die Anzahl der Todesfälle oder beides reduziert hat, aber viele der Studien weisen methodische Schwächen auf. Nach der bilateralen risikomindernden Mastektomie waren die meisten Frauen mit ihrer Entscheidung zufrieden, sie berichteten jedoch über weniger Zufriedenheit mit den kosmetischen Ergebnissen, ihrem Körperbild und sexuellen Gefühlen. Eine der Komplikationen der risikomindernden Mastektomie war die Notwendigkeit für zusätzliche unvorhergesehene Operationen, besonders bei Frauen, die sich einer Rekonstruktion nach der risikomindernden Mastektomie unterzogen hatten. Jedoch hatten die meisten Frauen auch weniger Sorge, Brustkrebs zu entwickeln und daran zu versterben, zusammen mit einer verminderten Zufriedenheit mit dem Körperbild und sexuellen Gefühlen.

Bei Frauen, die Krebs in einer Brust gehabt haben, kann die Entfernung der anderen Brust (kontralaterale risikomindernde Mastektomie) die Inzidenz für Krebs in dieser anderen Brust möglicherweise reduzieren, aber es besteht unzureichende Evidenz, dass dies das Überleben verbessert, weil ein anhaltendes Risiko für ein Wiederkehren oder Metastasen des ursprünglichen Krebs besteht.

Auch wenn veröffentlichte Beobachtungsstudien zeigten, dass die bilaterale risikomindernde Mastektomie wirksam war, um sowohl die Inzidenz und die Sterblichkeit aufgrund von Brustkrebs zu reduzieren, werden genauere prospektive Studien empfohlen. Die bilaterale risikomindernde Mastektomie sollte nur bei denjenigen mit hohem Krankheitsrisiko, zum Beispiel bei Trägerinnen von Mutationen in den Brustkrebsgenen BRCA1 und BRCA2, in Betracht gezogen werden. Die kontralaterale risikomindernde Mastektomie konnte die Inzidenz von kontralateralem Brustkrebs reduzieren, aber es gibt nur unzureichende Evidenz, dass die kontralaterale risikomindernde Mastektomie das Überleben verbessert und Studien, die mehrere Variablen kontrollieren, welche die Ergebnisse beeinflussen können, werden empfohlen. Es ist möglich, dass Selektionsbias in Form von gesünderen, jüngeren Frauen, die für die kontralaterale risikomindernde Mastektomie empfohlen wurden oder diese ausgewählt haben, zu besseren Gesamtüberlebenszahlen für die kontralaterale risikomindernde Mastektomie geführt hat.

Qualität der Evidenz

Etwas mehr als die Hälfte der Studien hatte ein niedriges Risiko für Selektionsbias, das heißt Studien adjustierten für systematische Unterschiede in Bezug auf die Prognose oder das Ansprechen auf die Behandlung zwischen den Gruppen. Ebenso hatten 60 % ein niedriges Risiko für Detektionsbias, das heißt, diese Studien berücksichtigten die systematischen Unterschiede in der Art, wie die Endpunkte gemessen und festgestellt wurden. Die primäre Ursache für beides, Selektions- und Detektionsbias, lag darin, nicht für alle wichtigen Störfaktoren, z. B. Risikofaktoren oder eine bilaterale risikomindernde Salpingoophorektomie (Operation, um Eileiter und Eierstöcke zu entfernen) gehabt zu haben, in den Interventions- und den Kontrollgruppen zu kontrollieren. Performance-Bias (Validierung der risikomindernden Mastektomie) war nicht problematisch, da viele Studien auf chirurgischen Berichten beruhten; drei stützten sich auf Selbstberichte und acht waren wegen mehreren Datenquellen und/oder einem breiten Zeitrahmen unklar. Ein hohes oder unklares Risiko für Attrition-Bias bestand in etwa 13 % der Studien. Die durchschnittliche oder mediane Nachbeobachtungszeit betrug zwischen 1 bis 22 Jahren.

Schlussfolgerungen

Angesichts der Anzahl an Frauen, die mit bilateraler oder kontralateraler risikomindernder Mastektomie überbehandelt werden könnten, ist es wichtig, dass Frauen und Ärzte das persönliche Risiko für jede einzelne Frau verstehen, bevor eine Operation in Betracht gezogen wird. Darüber hinaus sollte über andere Möglichkeiten, um das Brustkrebsrisiko zu reduzieren wie eine bilaterale risikomindernde Salpingoophorektomie oder eine Chemoprävention nachgedacht werden, wenn eine risikomindernde Mastektomie in Betracht gezogen wird.

Anmerkungen zur Übersetzung

J. Metzing, freigegeben durch Cochrane Deutschland.